Pakistan: State Sponsor of Terrorism?

by Christine Williams:

“The civilian government there [Pakistan] doesn’t control military policy, strategic policy… the army and the intelligence service do.” — Chris Alexander, Canada’s Minister of Citizenship and Immigration.

Pakistan’s High Commission to Canada rebuked Minister of Citizenship and Immigration Chris Alexander for calling Pakistan a state sponsor of terrorism. “Pakistan is not a state sponsor of terrorism, as naively alleged by Mr. Alexander, but is itself a victim of terrorism, determined to fight this menace and extend every possible co-operation to our neighbors and allies in this regard,” said Press Counselor Nazia Khalid.

Alexander, who served as Canada’s ambassador in Afghanistan and authored the book, “The Long Way Back: Afghanistan’s Quest for Peace,” stated on a CBC television news program that “[t]he civilian government there [Pakistan] doesn’t control military policy, strategic policy… but the army and the intelligence service do…. and they have denied the obvious, postponed this reckoning for years with so many terrorist groups, including al-Qaeda.”

 

Chris Alexander, Canada’s Minister of Citizenship and Immigration (2nd from right), pictured in 2005 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, during his time as Ambassador. (Image source: Screenshot from Chris Alexander YouTube video)

Alexander stated that the international community urgently needs to address the situation in Pakistan, as it is connected to other trouble spots including Syria, Iraq and Russia.

Alexander’s reference to Pakistan as a state sponsor of terrorism is far from naïve. It was further highlighted by his press secretary, Alexis Pavlich, who stated: “It is not just that these terrorist groups continue to operate from Pakistani territory: they also enjoy official, albeit covert, sanction and support from some within Pakistan’s state apparatus.”

A report by the Council on Foreign Relations, “Pakistan’s New Generation of Terrorists“, suggests there is nothing naïve about Alexander’s warnings about Pakistan. Its commitment to counterterrorism came into question in May 2011, when U.S. commandos killed al-Qaeda mastermind Osama bin Laden at a compound not far from Islamabad, and it was discovered that members of al-Qaeda’s leadership, as well as the Afghan Taliban, were living and operating out of Pakistan’s tribal areas and had combined forces with several militant insurgent groups, including the Taliban-linked Haqqani Network, believed to be supported by Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence.

According to a Reuters report , in late 2011, the Obama administration created a special unit based in Kabul to coordinate efforts against the Haqqani militant group. The organization had been named in “some of the most audacious attacks of the Afghan war,” including storming hotels popular with foreigners; bombing the Indian embassy in Kabul, and a 2011 attack on the U.S. embassy.

Since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, when Pakistan joined Washington presumably as an ally in combatting terrorism, analysts have accused Pakistan’s security and intelligence services of playing a “double game” and aiding militant groups fighting NATO in Afghanistan. In 2002, supporters of the Afghan Taliban sought refuge in Pakistan’s tribal areas. Five years later, over a dozen disparate militant groups united under the umbrella of Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), also known as the Pakistani Taliban. It was led by Baitullah Mehsud of South Waziristan, whom Pakistani authorities accused of orchestrating the December 2007 assassination of Pakistan’s former prime minister, Benazir Bhutto. Authorities produced an intercepted audio communication in which Mehsudreportedly confirmed that his men were responsible for the attack.

Read more at Gatestone Institute

Canada Confronts Pakistan on Bleak Human Rights Record

Pakistan Christian pers.

Canada also demanded that Pakistan address mistreatment of minorities such as Hindus, Christians and Ahmadis

BY TAHIR GORA:

The Pakistani Consul-General in Toronto, Muhammad Nafees Zakaria, was not happy when he had to listen to Canadian Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, Chris Alexander. The Minister’s message was clear: Pakistan must address its human rights violations and mistreatment of minorities such as Hindus, Christians and Ahmadis.

Alexander was speaking to the International Christian Voice’s event in memory of Pakistani parliamentarian Shahbaz Bhatti, who was assassinated by the Taliban three years ago for demanding an end to the country’s blasphemy law. The blasphemy law is like a black sword hanging over the heads of Pakistan’s minorities. There is even a shameful declaration form for Ahmadi Muslims that declares them to be non-Muslims at the Consul-General’s Toronto office.

Alexander mentioned the Pakistani state authorities’ bleak record on free press. He talked about a journalist, Saleem Shahzad, who was allegedly killed by the notorious intelligence agencies.

Pakistani Consul-General Zakaria did not say a single word about repealing the blasphemy law. He didn’t even say he’d deliver the message to the Pakistani government. He couldn’t even bring himself to tell Canadian parliamentarians that he’d pass on their concerns to Islamabad, even if he doesn’t agree with Alexander.

Instead, Zakaria blamed the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan for the problem of the Taliban in Pakistan. He framed the Taliban as a product of the covert U.S. effort against the Soviets, leaving Pakistan innocent and noble. This is a common excuse used by the Pakistani establishment that doesn’t want to take responsibility for their involvement in creating the problem of the Taliban and other extremists.

Read more at Clarion Project

Also see:

Sanctions needed against Pakistan’s spy agency

USSoldierPakistanSoldiertoonBy A. D. Kendall:

When dealing with undesirable behavior by foreign governments, the U.S. has increasingly employed narrowly targeted sanctions against individual officials of those governments, from human rights abusers in Syria to Russian leaders responsible for the annexation of Crimea.

But the same logic has yet to be applied to the ISI, Pakistan’s terrorist-sponsoring intelligence agency, which, compared to Russia and Syria, has posed a more direct threat to U.S. forces and civilians through the ISI’s sponsorship of terrorism against our troops in Afghanistan and through the safe haven it provided to Osama Bin Laden.

New York Times reporter Carlotta Gall revealed last week that, “Soon after the Navy SEAL raid on Bin Laden’s house, a Pakistani official told me that the United States had direct evidence that the ISI chief, Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, knew of Bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad,”  and that the ISI ran a special desk to “handle” Bin Laden.

The Bin Laden revelation is only the tip of the iceberg.  The Taliban itself was created by Pakistan, which allowed Al Qaeda to use Afghanistan as a base for hatching the 9/11 plot.  The perpetrators of the 26/11 terrorist attacks against Mumbai that left over 160 dead were also “clients and creations of the ISI.”

In an intercepted conversation, former ISI chief Gen. Ashfaq Kayani was heard describing Jalaluddin Haqqani, leader of the terrorist Haqqani network, as a “strategic asset.”  That is the way that Pakistani intelligence has looked at jihadists for decades—that holy warriors provide strategic depth and variety to the conventional armed forces along Pakistan’s borders.  They regard terrorism as a tool in a broader arsenal against Pakistan’s foes, making the country a state sponsor of terrorism in the truest sense of the phrase.

Read more at The Terror Finance Blog

Face the Truth: Pakistan Is Not An Ally

pak

The U.S. government is in dire need of an intervention: its friends need to get it to seek professional help for its addiction to shoveling huge amounts of money to old Cold War allies that aren’t really allies at all. The problem is that the only friends who could stage such an orchestrated effort are just as far gone themselves.

By Robert Spencer:

Journalist Carlotta Gall, who reported from Afghanistan for the New York Times for twelve years, reported Wednesday that

“soon after the Navy SEAL raid on Bin Laden’s house, a Pakistani official told me that the United States had direct evidence that the ISI chief, Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, knew of Bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad. The information came from a senior United States official, and I guessed that the Americans had intercepted a phone call of Pasha’s or one about him in the days after the raid. ‘He knew of Osama’s whereabouts, yes,’ the Pakistani official told me. The official was surprised to learn this and said the Americans were even more so.”

He shouldn’t have been. It has been obvious for years that the Pakistanis have been aiding the same jihadists that the U.S. government has been giving them billions of dollars to fight. The New York Times reported on that at length back in 2008. And now we learn that not only did Ahmed Shuja Pasha, the head of the Pakistani government’s spy service, knew the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden, but also that so did many other top officials in the Pakistani government.

Those who are genuinely surprised by this news probably also think that Islam is a Religion of Peace that has been hijacked by a Tiny Minority of Extremists. After all, this is the country where the jihad terror leader Hafiz Saeed, on whom the U.S. has placed a $10 million bounty, lives openly and comfortably. International Business Times reported in early March that Saeed “lives as a free man in Lahore,” even though he is “chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawah (JUD), a parent organisation of banned Lashkar-e-Taiba (LET). The organization was implicated in the 2008 attacks on Mumbai in India, which claimed 166 lives.” Not only that, but “Pakistan had twice placed Saeed under house arrest since 2001, but had let him go under suspicious circumstances.” And today, “JUD operates quite visibly in parts of Pakistan, with its own website and a twitter page.”

Meanwhile, Sky News reported in January that “Pakistani officials have reportedly used a secret counter-terrorism fund to buy wedding gifts, luxury carpets and gold jewellery for relatives of ministers and visiting dignitaries.” This is better than funneling to the terrorists themselves the money that the Pakistani government received from the U.S. to fight terror, but it shows how seriously the Pakistani authorities have taken their role in the “war on terror”: not seriously at all.

Read more at Front Page

See also:

  • Video - Documentary: Pakistan Double Cross on Terrorism - includes two part article by written Patrick Poole in 2012 exposing a 20 year influence operation by the Pakistani ISI and Ghulam Nabi Fai that may explain US foreign policy towards Pakistan

Falsely Accused of Blasphemy, Source of Islamist Outrage: Just Another Pakistani Christian’s Story

Twenty-six year old Adnan Prince (Adnan Masih), falsely accused of blasphemy and imprisoned in Pakistan. (Photo credit: The Voice Society via World Watch Monitor)

Twenty-six year old Adnan Prince (Adnan Masih), falsely accused of blasphemy and imprisoned in Pakistan. (Photo credit: The Voice Society via World Watch Monitor)

by  (@Cuchulain09)

World Watch Monitor (WWM), a service that provides news on worldwide persecuted church, on December 16, 2013 reported on a visit with Pakistani Christian Adnan Prince (or Adnan Masih) at his jail cell in Lahore.

Prince, aged 26, was arrested under the dreaded charge of blasphemy, Pakistan Penal Code’s Section 295, parts A, B and C – for allegedly outraging religious feelings, defiling the Koran and defaming Mohammed. This easily-manipulated charge, under which so many Pakistani Christians (not to mention many Muslims) have suffered, carries a sentence of either life imprisonment or execution.

LeT flagWWM reported that the accusation came when Prince found a copy of a book written by Maulana Ameer Hamza, the leader of Jamat-ud-Dawa (JuD), a political arm of the jihadi organization Lashkar-e-Taiba, which claimed responsibility for the Mumbai bombings, while he was filling in for his brother at the Diamond Glass shop in Lahore on October 7, 2013.

Prince, who has a Master’s degree in English literature and training from United Pentecostal seminary, began to read Hamza’s book entitled  I asked the Bible why the Qur’ans were set on fire (Urdu: Mein ney Bible sey poocha Qur’an kyun jaley), and take notes inside it.

Literature majors the world over will know the impulse to underline and take notes while reading a book. If, however, one is in Pakistan, and particularly if one is Christian, one should be very circumspect about writing in any book, let alone a book with the word Qur’an in the title.

Sure enough, a Muslim co-worker saw him, and, says WWM – using the phrase repeated o’er and o’er — “took offense.” The man, Abid Mehmood, reported Prince to the local police station for marking the book with “abusive words against the Prophet of Islam,” Prince recounted to WWM. Morning Star Newsanother Christian news service, reported that Mehmood also notified the JuD, who issued a fatwa against Prince.

The young Christian, who is married and the father of two little girls, told WWM that he had done nothing wrong. He explained, “I found the book quite erroneous, giving incorrect information about Christianity. So I wrote comments with Biblical references in several places, but no abusive language was used.”

Once the declaration of blasphemy has been made in Pakistan, no amount of factual evidence, rational thought, or logic ever seems to make a difference in how things play out. Prince fled for his life, but returned to Lahore on November 6, after police arrested his mother, brother, aunt, and uncle and warned they would not be released until he turned himself in.

Read more at Juicy Ecumenism

A BBC FIlm: Nuclear Secrets & Pakistan’s Terror Trader

download (64)Clarion Project:

A step-by-step account about how Pakistani scientist A.Q. Khan stole nuclear secrets from the Dutch, built Pakistan’s nuclear arsenal and put the world at the mercy of rogue regimes now in the possession of nuclear weapons.

 

 

Famous Kashmir Vacation Spot Now Teaming With Islamists

Tarek Fatah in KashmirBY TAREK FATAH:

“Death to Israel,” the banner screamed. Next to it was the now-familiar Muslim chant, “Death to America.”

Further down the road, the late Ayatollah Khomeini stared down angrily at the citizenry.

As a large crowd of Sunday shoppers milled around an overflowing open-air bazaar, other banners showed Sayyed Nasrallah of Hezbollah, with former Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad wearing his familiar sheepish grin.

This banner graces Srinagar’s ‘Laal Chowk’.

No, I was not in Tehran or South Lebanon. This wasn’t an Alawite stronghold in Syria or scenes from Toronto’s infamous annual “Al-Quds” rally staged by Islamists belching disdain towards the West.

I was in Srinagar, the summer capital of the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir.

Flaunting hatred and celebrating jihadi terrorists was once unthinkable in the city referred to by a Mogul king as paradise on earth.

Home to a people of amazing beauty, culture and cuisine, where an Islam once flourished that was bereft of the harshness of the desert.

Where mosques took architectural inspiration from Buddhist pagodas, not from forcibly converted Orthodox Christian churches.

Though the Pakistan-backed insurgency that broke out in 1989-90 has been largely decimated by the Indian Army and the Kashmir government, consequences of the decade-long strife remain.

After all, 40,000 young Kashmiri Muslims died and almost the entire Hindu population of the valley was ethnically cleansed and forced to flee from their ancestral homeland.

The hope of one segment of the population that Kashmir would join Islamic Pakistan seems a forgotten dream.

Read more at Clarion Project

Pakistan Calls Out U.S. for Hit on World’s Most Wanted Terrorist

Taliban leader killed

The cost of Pakistan’s morally bankrupt policy has been the death of thousands and thousands of Americans, Afghanis and Pakistanis.

BY RYAN MAURO:

A U.S. drone has killed Pakistani Taliban chief Hakimullah Mehsud, the terrorist behind the failed Times Square bombing in 2010 and countless attacks in Pakistan. The U.S. is doing the job that the Pakistani should be doing—and the response of America’s “ally” is furor, not appreciation.

Pakistan’s policy towards the Taliban is filled with contradictions and false hope. It treats the Afghan Taliban as a proxy, while it battles the Pakistani Taliban branch that wants to overthrow the government. The cost of this inconsistent and morally bankrupt policy has been thousands and thousands of American, Afghan and Pakistani lives.

The U.S. killed Mehsud just three days before Pakistani government representatives were due to meet with him for peace talks. One of Mehsud’s demands for peace was the imposition of Sharia law, so these negotiations were bound to go nowhere. Still, the Pakistani government invested its hopes in the imagined reasonableness of the Pakistani Taliban and Mehsud—and is furious at the U.S., at least publicly.

Tellingly, Pakistan’s interior minister didn’t point to Mehsud’s record – namely, his involvement in capturing about 300 Pakistani soldiers in 2007; killing U.S. soldiers; killing Afghan and Pakistani civilians; his ties to Al-Qaeda or his role in the attempted car bomb detonation in New York City in 2010.

Instead, Pakistan’s interior Minister said the U.S. killed him in order to “sabotage” peace talks. The foreign minister joined in, saying the strike “is not just the killing of one person, it’s the death of all peace efforts.” The people hearing these words are led to think that it is the U.S., not the Taliban, who is prolonging the war.

 

 

Read more at Clarion Project

ICNA New York Scrubs Accused War Criminal From Web Page

673_largeby IPT News:

Can We Say Goodbye To A Pakistani Spy?

IPT News
August 5, 2013

Bangladesh War Crimes Trial Proceeds Without ICNA Official

IPT News:

 

Pakistan Running Influence Operations in the U.S.

Ghulam Nabi Fai

Ghulam Nabi Fai

BY RYAN MAURO:

You can say that the Russians, Saudis and Chinese run influence operations in the U.S. You can also say it about Pakistan—but if you [say] it about the Muslim Brotherhood, then you’re an “Islamophobe.” The nonsense of this is illuminated when you look at Pakistan’s massive influence campaign; a campaign that grew out of the Muslim Brotherhood’s own campaign and remains intertwined with it.

The Pakistani press recently erupted when author Ayesha Siddiqa tweeted that a Pakistani diplomat told her in 2007 that the Pakistani ISI intelligence service had “finally” infiltrated think-tanks in Washington D.C. to influence U.S. policy.

One of the errors the ISI was making, according to Siddiqa, is that its agents lacked doctorates and credentials to compete with Indians. As evidence of the campaign’s success, she pointed to Moeed Yusuf, an expert on Pakistan at the U.S.Institute of Peace and Arif Rafique, adjunct scholar at the Middle East Institute.

Another Pakistani pointed out by the Times of India is Shuja Nawaz, the director of the Atlantic Council’s South Asia Center. His brother is a former chief of the Pakistani army.

The Times of India buttresses Siddiqa’s claim, observing the “perceptible increase in Pakistani experts in U.S. think tanks and universities over the past decade.” The experts include several former Pakistani diplomats. The Pakistani consulate is also helping to raise money for the Charlie Wilson Chair in Pakistan Studies at the University of Texas in Austin.

The Pakistani government is spending a fortune on lobbyists and is deploying the ISI to influence U.S. policy and public opinion. Siddiqa’s report is just a reiteration of what is already known.

The smoking gun is the case of Ghulam Nabi Fai, leader of the Kashmiri-American Council, as best detailed by Patrick Poole. Fai was also secretly directing the Justice Foundation Kashmir Centre in the United Kingdom and the Kashmir Centre-European Union in Brussels, Belgium.

Read more at The Clarion Project

 

 

Video of Malala Yousafzai at U.N. Calling on World Leaders to Provide Education to Every Child

BO-aI-4CAAAtGrqNYT:

Updated | Thursday, 3:07 p.m. In a speech at the United Nations on her 16th birthday, Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for promoting education for girls in Pakistan, called on world leaders to provide “free, compulsory education” for every child.

“Let us pick up our books and our pens,” Ms. Yousafzai told young leaders from 100 countries at the United Nations Youth Assembly in New York. “They are our most powerful weapons. One child, one teacher, one book, and one pen can change the world. Education is the only solution.”

Ms. Yousafzai, noting that she was proud to be wearing a shawl that had once belonged to Benazir Bhutto, spoke in a calm, self-assured voice as she delivered her first major speech since she was shot on the left side of her head Oct. 9 on her way home from school in Pakistan’s Swat Valley.

In her speech, she recalled how the attackers had also shot her friends. “They thought that the bullets would silence us,” she said, “but they failed.”

And then, out of that silence came thousands of voices. The terrorists thought that they would change our aims and stop our ambitions but nothing changed in my life except this: Weakness, fear and hopelessness died. Strength, power and courage was born. I am the same Malala. My ambitions are the same. My hopes are the same. My dreams are the same

As my colleagues, Taha Siddiqui and Declan Walsh report, Taliban militants have pressed their violent campaign against girls’ education in northwestern Pakistan, attacking more than 800 schools in the region since 2009.

From that time, Ms. Yousafzai was a outspoken critic of the Taliban campaign.

 

But Ms. Yousafzai stressed in her speech that it was “not my day” but “the day of every woman, every boy and girl who have raised their voices for their rights.”

“Thousands of people have been killed by the terrorists and millions have been injured,” she said. “I am just one of them. So here I stand, one girl among many. I speak not for myself but for those without voice.”

She also emphasized that she had no desire for revenge against the Taliban or any other terrorist group. She included the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Nelson Mandela, Gandhi and Mother Teresa as among the leaders who have inspired her.

She said she wanted education for every child, including the “sons and daughters of the Taliban” and terrorists.

“I do not even hate the Talib who shot me,” Ms. Yousafzai said. “Even if there was a gun in my hand and he was in front of me, I would not shoot him.”

She attributed her nonviolence philosophy and ability to forgive from lessons “learned from my father and my mother.”

On Friday, Ms. Yousafzai and her supporters also formally unveiled The Malala Fund, a non-profit organization that raises money and distributes grants to support education for girls.

And as Mashable reported, her father worked with a Grammy-award winning producer to put together a music video called, I am Malala, with three young artists and more than 30 choir singers from around the world. It was released on Wednesday.

Read more

TRIFECTA – Jihadists Execute Sisters and Mother for Dancing in the Rain

Noor Basra and Noor Sheza

Noor Basra and Noor Sheza

Two sisters in Pakistan made the mistake of dancing and playing in the rain. It earned them a death sentence from local jihadists. What does Trifecta think of these honor killings? Find out:

 

Pakistan Bankrolls Terrorist Group

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed

by Mohshin Habib:

“They compete for the religious vote bank.” — Arif Nizami, Pakistani poltical analyst

Pakistan has just allocated over $4,000,000 for a Center, a “Knowledge Park” and other initiatives for the Islamist parent body of the banned terrorist group that attacked Mumbai, India, in 2008.

The Pakistani provincial government of Punjab included in its budget for fiscal 2013-14 a sum of 61.35 million Pakistani Rupees ($616,000 USD) to fund the largest Center of Jamaat-ud-Dawah (JuD) — the Islamist parent body of the banned terror organization Laskar-e-Taiba (LeT), which committed the Mumbai attacks.

In addition to that allocation for the JuD Center, known as Markaz-e-Taiba, the Pakistani government has also allocated Rs 350 million ($3,500,000 USD) for setting up a “Knowledge Park” and other initiatives at the Center.

A spokesman for the Punjab government defended the gift by saying that the government had taken administrative control of the welfare institutions being run by JuD, in compliance with Security Council resolutions of the United Nations. In December 2008, India formally requested the United Nations to designate JuD a terrorist organization, a request with which the UN Security Council complied. In 2012, the U.S. State Department offered a bounty of $10,000,000 on the head of JuD’s Emir, or chief, Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, relating to the Mumbai massacre. The US authority also offered $2 million for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Hafiz Mohammad Saeed’s brother-in-law Abdur Rehman Makki, second in command of LeT. Makki is said to be in close contact with Taliban supreme commander Mullah Omar and Ayman Al-Zawahiri. Ajmal Kassab, accused in the Mumbai attack, is said to have received training at the JuD’s center, Markaz-e-Taiba.

However, a recent report in the Pakistani daily The News said that despite the appointment of an administrator, the Markaz-e-Taiba is effectively in the control of JuD, and that Pakistani and foreign journalists cannot go inside the Center without first obtaining permission from the media cell of the JuD. A source, according to the report, said a few months ago that JuD’s Emir, Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, held a convention at Markaz-e-Taiba, largely attended by JuD activists.

Read more at Gatestone Institute

Also see:

BBC Documentary: Pakistan Double Cross on Terrorism (includes Patrick Poole’s  expose of a 20 year influence operation by the Pakistani ISI that may explain US foreign policy towards Pakistan)