OSCE Conference in Vienna: Don’t Mention the “I” Word

Tundra Tabloids, May 31, 2015:

ISLAM.

Winston Churchill whispers to FDR:

”Don’t say German National Socialism, for in doing so it gives the impression that being German motivates people to war, terrorism and other crimes.”

Also read: OSCE in Free Fall

Gates of Vienna:

The Word That Wasn’t There

Yesterday, upon the air,
I heard a word that wasn’t there.
It wasn’t there again today,
I wish that it would go away…

(With apologies to Hughes Mearns)

In his report yesterday on the latest OSCE conference, Henrik Ræder Clausen included this summary of a dominant meme among ideological leaders in the West:

Panel members stressed the importance of not calling the Islamic State the “Islamic State”, for doing so could give the impression that Islam motivates people to war, terrorism and other crimes.

The avoidance of the I-word seems to have become a fixation in the revolving-door world of NGOs and state functionaries, particularly in Europe. It’s as if all the participants have been mysteriously hypnotized, and now wander around glassy-eyed, muttering the phrase “nothing to do with Islam” over and over again, their repetitive chant forming a background susurrus at every international function where important people assemble to hand down momentous policy decisions.

A notable example of the mindset may be found this handout from the OSCE Viennameeting:

The four terrorist outfits shown in the chart are composed of different ethnic groups, operate in geographically separate areas, represent disparate cultures, and speak a variety of languages. The only thing these groups have in common is the word that wasn’t there.

When required to identify a common ideology, Western bien-pensants prefer to discuss “extremism” or “radicalization” — modifiers with no substantive objects. If cornered, they may refer to “Islamism” or “radical Islam”, but never plain old unmodified ISLAM.

It seems that a prerequisite for receiving funding from any government agency or charitable foundation is the absolute refusal to consider Islamic political ideology as an explanation for anything bad that happens in the world.

You can’t say that, old chap. It just isn’t done.

The Glazov Gang-Dr. Phyllis Chesler on “An American Bride in Kabul.”

Frontpage:

Dr. Chesler joined the program to discuss her memoir and all of its ingredients, including being trapped in Afghanistan as a young bride, her terrifying experiences under Islamic Gender Apartheid, her views on the burqa and on how the feminist Left has betrayed Muslim women, her main message, and much, much more:

American Bride in KabulPhyllis Chesler is an Emerita Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies at City University of New York, best-selling author, legendary feminist leader, Fellow at the Middle East Forum and the author of 15 books. She is the author of her new memoir, An American Bride in Kabul.

Intelligent Multiculturalism – Survival and the Beauty of Openness

blind-multiculturalism-vulnerable-to-invasionBy Citizen Warrior:

Blind multiculturalism and political correctness seem to be the only things  standing in the way of simply adopting what should be commonsense  self-defense: Arresting or deporting those who propose the overthrow of our government (which is apparently happening in the majority of mosques) and stopping all concessions to this relentless band of interlopers (orthodox Muslims).

If you’ve got someone pushing for special concessions regardless of fairness, and who have stated their intentions to usurp  the legitimate government, you would think it a no-brainer to stop them.

The two things that prevent most Westerners from even knowing about this  issue are political correctness and blind multiculturalism. These two  cultural blots prevent politicians from speaking openly and directly  about orthodox Islam. They prevent newspapers and television reporters  from reporting openly and honestly about it, and they even prevent  individual people talking about it among themselves out of fear of  making a social blunder and being considered racist or bigoted.

Of the two, I would say blind multiculturalism is the more important one.  If that’s true, it means the single biggest barrier to being heard by a  significant portion of the population of non-Muslims — the one thing  stopping a widespread public education about Islam — is blind  multiculturalism, so let’s deal with it right now.

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