The Lessons of History: Kristallnacht in Egypt

pic_giant_081913_SM_Coptic-KristallnachtBy Hans A. von Spakovsky:

As the military (with the support of secular groups that don’t want an Islamist state) battles the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and Americans argue over how to react, we should look back at history to understand why we should support the military as the lesser of two evils and hope for its success.  Those who know the history of the Muslim Brotherhood and see the murderous attacks it has launched on the homes, businesses, schools, and churches of Coptic Christians, who represent about 10 percent of the population, will recognize that we have seen this type of behavior before.

images (11)The Brotherhood is simply using the same tactics and ideology of the political party that it allied itself with in the 1930s and 40s: the Nazi Party.  What is happening to the Coptic Christians being beaten, kidnapped, and killed all over Egypt is similar to [1] what happened to Jews in Germany during Kristallnacht [2] on November 9-10, 1938, when Jews were killed and beaten and their homes, stores, schools, and synagogues ransacked, looted, and demolished in Germany and Austria.

The Muslim Brotherhood was founded in Egypt in 1928 by Sheikh Hassan al-Banna, who was a great admirer of Adolf Hitler and who formed an alliance with the Nazis.  The Brotherhood helped distribute translated copies of Mein Kampf and other Nazi propaganda.  The ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood is eerily similar to Nazi fascism, including its ultimate objective of world conquest and a new caliphate.  The only difference is it believes in the supremacy of Islam instead of the supremacy of the Aryan race.

The Nazis even helped fund the Great Arab Revolt of 1936-1939 against the Jews and British in Palestine, which was led by Hajj Amin al-Husseini, the grand mufti of Jerusalem, and one of the leaders of the Muslim Brotherhood.  It was al-Husseini who met with Hitler in 1941 [3] and helped augment the traditional Arab hatred of Jews with plans for a genocidal campaign against Jews.

The fascist origins of the Muslim Brotherhood are fully ingrained in everything it does.  Its hatred for Jews has migrated into a hatred of all non-Muslims, particularly Christian Arabs.  In the Muslim Brotherhood’s eyes, Coptic Egyptians are traitors to their race and the only true religion, Islam.  Many Americans refuse to understand that jihadists like the Brotherhood do not accept any separation between church and state — the only acceptable government is a Muslim theocratic state based on Sharia law.

There is another parallel to Nazi Germany in the situation in Egypt that Americans should also keep in mind.  Adolf Hitler and the Nazis were democratically elected in the 1932 elections just like Mohamed Morsi was in 2012.  Hitler then set out to destroy Germany’s democracy [4] and make himself and the Nazi Party its supreme ruler.  Morsi has spent the past year taking the same type of steps, slowly throttling his opposition and media critics, and working to make his formally banned fascist party, the Muslim Brotherhood, sovereign over all of Egypt.

Just like Hitler and the Nazis, the Muslim Brotherhood wants full dictatorial control of the country and the elimination of Jews, Christians, and all non-Muslims. There is no question that if they can gain control of the military, they will do everything possible to prepare for and launch a war to destroy Israel.  That is a fundamental tenet of their ideology.

Many forget that Hitler had a very uneasy relationship initially with the German military.  It was the only viable force in Germany that could have deposed Hitler and the Nazis as they started to consolidate power.  But the military never did so and Hitler acted quickly to take control of the military to prevent any such opposition from developing.  It was only late in the war in 1944 that a small number of senior military officers finally tried to assassinate Hitler to get rid of him and end the war.

But what if the German military had acted much earlier?  Hitler in essence consolidated his power [5] in the two years from 1932 to 1934 through a complicated series of actions, including plots like the Reichstag fire, the Night of the Long Knives, and the passage of various laws that effectively swept away all of his opposition.  If the German military had crushed Hitler, his SA Brownshirts, the Hitler Youth, the SS, and all of the other Nazi Party affiliates in 1933, perhaps millions of people would not have died in a genocidal war and Nazi concentration camps.  The history of Europe might have been completely different.

Fortunately, the Egyptian military has acted before Morsi and his own Muslim Brotherhood Brownshirts had the full opportunity to consolidate their power.  Morsi and his clan are thugs with views no different than those who stood in the docks at Nuremberg from 1945 to 1949.  If we can learn anything from the history of the 1930s and Nazi Germany, we should be hoping that the Egyptian military is successful in crushing the new version of the Nazis in the Middle East.  That is the only way that a real democracy will ever have a chance to be born in Egypt.

Read more at PJ Media

 

Arab Spring Egypt’s ‘Legal’ Persecution of Christians

by Raymond Ibrahim
Special to IPT News
May 29, 2013

Egypt’s Christians fear ‘a season of blood’

By Betsy Hiel

CAIRO — In the Shubra El Kheima section of this  sprawling capital’s outskirts, a herd of goats and three rail-thin horses pick  through garbage piles.

Rattling old cars and exhaust-belching buses honk at  darting three-wheeled “tuc-tuc” taxis.

On a narrow dirt street, four police officers guard  brick pillars rising from the mud.

This was going to be a Coptic Christian community  center — until ultra-Islamist Salafis seized it and declared it a Muslim mosque,  according to Emad El Erian, a spokesman for a Coptic rights organization.

“They threatened to burn some of the Coptic houses in  the neighborhood,” he said.

Salafis occupied the site every night until a  prosecutor ruled that the land belonged to the Copts and ordered a police guard,  local residents say.

“It’s as if (they) are challenging the police, the  government and the general prosecutor, and that they want to drag the Coptic  Christians into sectarian violence, a season of blood,” El Erian said.

Last week’s incident was the latest attack on Egypt’s  Christian minority — but not the week’s only one: A veiled woman sheared a  Christian girl’s hair in Cairo’s subway.

Such attacks — like crime in general — have risen in  number and intensity since last year’s ouster of dictator Hosni Mubarak.  Christian churches, homes and shops have been looted or torched; Christians have  been forced to flee some villages.

The situation seems to contradict President Obama’s  assertion in the Oct. 22 presidential debate that Egyptian officials must “take  responsibility for protecting religious minorities, and we have put significant  pressure on them to make sure they’re doing that.”

President Mohamed Morsy, a former Muslim Brotherhood  leader, insists Egypt is open to Muslims and Christians. Yet many Christians,  who make up 10 to 15 percent of Egypt’s 85 million people, believe the Islamist  government is not protecting them.

“Nothing has been done to reform or achieve equality  among Egyptians,” said Youssef Sidhom, the editor of Watani, a Christian  newspaper. He dismisses Morsy’s commitment as “superficial.”

The post-Mubarak rise of the Salafis, who are akin to  Saudi Arabia’s ultra-religious Wahhabis, frightens Christians and less-fanatical  Muslims.

On Friday, thousands of Salafis marched here to  demand “implementation of the Shariah,” or Islamic law. The mostly bearded crowd  waved green Saudi flags and the black banners of al-Qaida and other jihadi  groups.

One veiled Salafi woman carried a sign congratulating  Obama on his re-election as president. Other posters demanded freedom for Omar  Abdel Rahman, the Egyptian “Blind Sheikh” who is in a U.S. prison for his role  in the 1993 bombing of New York’s World Trade Center.

‘A dangerous, slippery slope’

Sherif Rushdy

Sherif Rushdy, chief judge of a Cairo appeals court,  describes Copts as “a ship in the middle of a sandy hurricane.” Many are trying  to leave the country, he said.

Eighteen months ago, a fight erupted between a Muslim  and a Christian in Abu Qorqas, a village in Upper Egypt. Muslims then rampaged  for days, looting and burning 36 Christian homes and shops.

Rushdy’s brother Ala’a owned a restaurant that was  torched and a small cafeteria that was ransacked. Soldiers guarded Ala’a’s home  from a mob shouting, “God is great!”

Twenty people were arrested: 12 Christians, including  Rushdy’s brother, and eight Muslims.

“They investigated him and accused him of owning  machine guns, but they didn’t find any,” Rushdy said. “They accused him of  attempted murder.”

At a trial nine months later, an Egyptian general  called the charges nonsensical, Rushdy said. Yet Ala’a and the other Christians  were convicted and given life sentences; the eight Muslims were acquitted.

“We were shocked,” Rushdy recalled. “We had brought  his clothes (to the courtroom) because we thought he was coming home with us.”

He continues to file legal appeals but said that only  a presidential pardon will free his brother.

“We are on a dangerous, slippery slope,” he said. “The extremists have a principle: Whoever is not with us is against us.”

He dismisses the possibility of any help from the  Obama administration: “They didn’t do anything for their own ambassador, who was  killed in Libya. What will they do for us?”

Read more at Trib Live

 

The World Through Rose Colored Glasses (with video)

By Gadi Adelman:

The photo accompanying this article was taken in central Cairo on October 13,  2011. Nearly 3,000 Egyptian mourners gathered in honor of Coptic Christians who  were among 25 people murdered during a demonstration over an attack on a  church.

Those who don’t want to believe this is actually occurring in the 21 Century  won’t. No matter how many pictures or videos make it out some people just will  dismiss it all as Islamophobic lies.

I had no intention of covering this story this week, I’ve written about the  murder of Coptic Christians before as well as those being murdered in other  countries as well. Over two years ago in April 2010 my article “No  Big Deal, Just Some People in Africa, Right?” was about the murder of  Christians in Nigeria at the hands of Islamists.

This all started when someone posted a picture on my  Facebook page.

I read the denials of the stories, pictures and videos of the Crucifixions of  the Egyptian Coptic’s and decided to set the record straight.

One individual posted a comment under this picture on my Facebook page,

this isn’t in Egypt. stop telling lies about EGYPT. you jews will never  remove hatred from your hearts to EGYPT

The National Post reported that none of these stories were true either.  Author Jonathan Kay wrote an article  on August 22 that “Egypt’s “crucifixion” hoax becomes an instant Internet myth”.  He starts his article with,

Have you heard the one about how Christians are being nailed up on crucifixes  and left to die in front of the Egyptian presidential place?

It’s a story worth dissecting – not because it’s true (it isn’t), but because  it is a textbook example of how the Internet, once thought to be the perfect  medium of truth-seeking, has been co-opted by culture warriors as a weapon to  fire up the naïve masses with lies and urban legends.

“Fire up the naïve masses with lies and urban legends”, really? Well Mr. Kay  I suggest some light reading for you. It’s this year’s Annual Report from the  U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom.

The cover of the report shows a similar picture to the one I chose for my  story. You know the one, where “nearly 3,000 Egyptian mourners gathered in honor  of Coptic Christians who were among 25 people murdered during a demonstration  over an attack on a church.” I guess it was Photo-shopped.

But what is more interesting than the cover picture is who makes up this  agency and what the report  contains.

The website  U.S.  Commission on International Religious Freedom explains this on the ‘about’  page,

USCIRF is an independent, bipartisan U.S. federal government commission.  USCIRF Commissioners are appointed by the President and the leadership of both  political parties in the Senate and the House of Representatives. USCIRF’s  principal responsibilities are to review the facts and circumstances of  violations of religious freedom internationally and to make policy  recommendations to the President, the Secretary of State and Congress.

So let’s understand from the outset that those involved with this agency are  handpicked by the President and made up from both political parties. So for all  you naysayers out there argue with them, not me.

I saw this coming long before Hosni Mubarak was ousted. Back in February of  2011 while those in the Obama administration were saying that the Muslim  Brotherhood wouldn’t place a candidate in the Egyptian elections, I wrote in my article  “A Series of Unfortunate Re-Runs”,

The Muslim Brotherhood has been waiting for an opportunity like this for over  60 years and it is not something they are going to let slip by. Since the fall  of the Ottoman Empire in 1924 and the founding of the Muslim Brotherhood only 4  years later in 1928 there has never been an opportunity such as this for a  return of a Caliphate and you can bet your life the Brotherhood is working  harder than any other group or government to see that this happens.

So now that the Muslim Brotherhood leader, Mohamed Morsi has become the  President of Egypt is it really any surprise that we see Coptic Christians being  murdered for no other reason than they are Christian?

It appears to be no surprise to those that wrote the annual  report from the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom either.  The report is 331 pages and from start to finish this report is a “who’s who” of  Islamic countries.

The second paragraph of page one starts off with Egypt,

In Egypt, an epicenter of the Arab Spring, hope turned to dismay, as human  rights conditions, particularly religious freedom abuses, worsened dramatically  under military rule.   Authorities continued to prosecute and sentence  citizens charged with blasphemy and allowed official media to incite violence  against religious minority members, while failing to protect them or to convict  responsible parties.  Law enforcement and the courts fostered a climate of  impunity in the face of repeated attacks against Coptic Christians and their  churches.  Rather than defending these minorities, military and security  forces turned their guns on them, using live ammunition against Coptic  Christians and other demonstrators, killing dozens and wounding hundreds in  Maspero Square.

Page two continues with just a few instances,

To be sure, religious freedom abuses harm members of religious majorities and  minorities alike.  But make no mistake:  across much of the world,  persons associated with religious minority communities often are harmed the  most.  Even when violations do not include or encourage violence, intricate  webs of discriminatory rules, regulations, and edicts can impose tremendous  burdens on these communities and their adherents, making it difficult for them  to function and grow from one generation to the next, potentially threatening  their existence.  For example, while an electoral democracy, Turkey fails  to legally recognize religious minority communities, such as the Alevis, the  Greek, Armenian, and Syriac Orthodox Churches, the Roman Catholic and Protestant  Churches, and the Jewish community.  Furthermore, Turkish officials meddle  in these communities‘ internal government and education and limit their worship  rights.

But as I stated earlier it is a “who’s who” of Islamic countries. The report  explains those countries that are of particular concern,

The first section highlights countries which USCIRF recommends that the State  Department designate as countries of particular concern (CPCs) under IRFA  (International Religious Freedom Act) for particularly severe violations of  religious freedom.

The countries that make up the “CPCs” are listed on page 4,

For the 2012 Annual Report, USCIRF recommends that the Secretary of State  designate the following 16 countries as CPCs: Burma, the Democratic People‘s  Republic of Korea (North Korea), Egypt, Eritrea, Iran, Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan,  the People‘s Republic of China, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Tajikistan, Turkey,  Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Vietnam.

Those countries that you would expect to see on this list are not mentioned  are because they are already listed as “CPCs”,

Afghanistan, Belarus, Cuba, India, Indonesia, Laos, Russia, Somalia,  Venezuela

The report then writes a chapter for each country of concern, but for this  article I am concentrating on Egypt since that appears to be the source of these  “internet myths”.

On page 50 of the report are the agencies “Findings” in Egypt,

FINDINGS: Over the past year, the Egyptian transitional government continued  to engage in and tolerate systematic, ongoing, and egregious violations of  freedom of thought, conscience and religion or belief.

Serious problems of discrimination, intolerance, and other human rights  violations against members of religious minorities, as well as disfavored  Muslims, remain widespread in Egypt. Violence targeting Coptic Orthodox  Christians increased significantly during the reporting period.  The  transitional government has failed to protect religious minorities from violent  attacks at a time when minority communities have been increasingly  vulnerable.  This high level of violence and the failure to convict those  responsible continued to foster a climate of impunity, making further violence  more likely.  During the reporting period, military and security forces  used excessive force and live ammunition targeting Coptic Christian  demonstrators and places of worship resulting in dozens of deaths and hundreds  of injuries.  The government also continued to prosecute, convict, and  impose prison terms on Egyptian citizens charged with blasphemy.   Implementation of previous court rulings – related to granting official identity  documents to Baha‘is and changing religious affiliation on identity documents  for converts to Christianity – has seen some progress but continues to lag,  particularly for Baha‘is. In addition, the government has not responded  adequately to combat widespread and virulent anti-Semitism in the  government-controlled media.

Understanding that this report was published in February of this year a lot  more deaths have occurred during the last 6 months. As noted in the above  section of the report,

This high level of violence and the failure to convict those responsible  continued to foster a climate of impunity, making further violence more  likely.

Unfortunately they were correct. The report continues,

Religious freedom conditions have not improved in most areas and attacks  targeting religious minorities have continued.  In 2011, violent sectarian  attacks, targeting primarily Coptic Orthodox Christians, have resulted in nearly  100 deaths, surpassing the death toll of the previous 10 years combined.   During the transitional period, the lack of adequate security in the streets has  contributed to lawlessness in parts of the country, particularly in Upper  Egypt.

Read more at Family Security Matters

FamilySecurityMatters.orgContributing  Editor Gadi  Adelman  is a freelance writer and lecturer on the history of  terrorism and  counterterrorism. He grew up in Israel, studying terrorism and  Islam for 35  years after surviving a terrorist bomb in Jerusalem in which 7  children were  killed. Since returning to the U. S., Gadi teaches and lectures  to law  enforcement agencies as well as high schools and colleges. He can be  heard  every Thursday night at 8PM est. on his own radio show “America Akbar”  on Blog  Talk Radio.  He can be reached through his website gadiadelman.com.

Watch this dramatic video showing the suffering of the Egyptian Copts posted by Walid Shoebat:

 

Murder of Copts Begins After Genocide Call

Fear and terror among Egypt’s Christians

By Raymond Ibrahim:

Hours after leaflets from Egypt’s jihadi organizations were distributed promising to “reward” any Muslim who kills any Christian Copt in Egypt, specifically naming several regions including Asyut, a report recently appeared concerning the random killing of a Christian store-owner.

According to reporter Menna Magdi, writing in a report published August 14 and titled “The serial killing of Copts has begun in Asyut,” unidentified men stormed a shoe-store, murdering the Christian owner, Refaat Eskander early in the morning. The son of the slain Copt said the murderers took advantage of the fact that his father was alone in the store at the time, adding that his father had no known quarrels with anyone. Only one witness saw one of the assassins as they fled the scene, who was dressed in Salafi attire.

Also, Coptic Solidarity reports that the “Christian Copts in Upper Egypt are under attack, hours after a call for their eradication appeared in the form of leaflets calling on Muslims to kill Copts, specifically naming regions of Upper Egypt.” The report tells of how Christians are being beat, their businesses set on fire, and their properties plundered, even as their attackers declare that “any Christian who dares to leave his house will be killed.” As usual, police appear only after all the damage has been done and the terrorists have fled with their booty.

 

What to expect from Egypt’s Morsi

by Aymenn Jawad Al-Tamimi

What to make of Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Morsi’s election as president of Egypt? What seems to be the most likely outcome is something analogous to the “constitutional settlements” of the early Roman Empire. That is, the military, like the Emperor Augustus in antiquity, will entrust to itself management of foreign policy, while granting Morsi (and a parliament, if new elections are allowed) – akin to the Senate in Rome – considerable autonomy with regards to the direction of domestic affairs, even as the military has assumed control over the drafting of the constitution.

Indeed, such a settlement would work well for the military, because, despite its extensive control of the economy, the burden of resolving the economic crisis would ultimately rest in Morsi’s hands. Currently, as Reuters reports, the country’s depleted foreign reserves can only cover “three months of import coverage,” while the local currency debt has increased to 600 billion Egyptian pounds ($99 billion), up from 500 billion before the unrest began in January 2011.

The International Monetary Fund has indicated that a $3.2 billion loan will only be granted if the country gets its finances in order, but the prospects of such a resolution appear to be bleak. Having Morsi take responsibility, therefore, can prove useful in directing potential civilian anger away from the military. On the other hand, the perception of a settlement between the military and the president could help to attract foreign investment.

With the military managing foreign policy, the chances of a full-blown war between Egypt and Israel are slim, despite bellicose rhetoric emanating from some quarters of the Muslim Brotherhood calling for the liberation of Jerusalem and establishment of a “United Arab States.” For one thing, Egypt lacks the means to launch and sustain a war against Israel. At the same time, however, one should not expect Egyptian firmness in dealing with rocket fire against the Jewish state or militant activity in the Sinai Peninsula.

In fact, one could well see the military adopt an approach toward militancy not dissimilar to the methods of the Pakistani security forces: that is, targeting those perceived to pose a direct threat to Egypt’s stability, while lacking resolve at best, and at worst playing a double game with other militants in order to continue receiving U.S. aid.

As for the domestic scene, it is probable that the Islamization trend that has been apparent over the past five or so decades will not only continue but could also accelerate. When the likes of Hosni Mubarak were in charge, the arrangement was such that Islamist ideology was allowed to disseminate at ground level. Now that Egypt has an elected Islamist president, it is to be expected that sentiments on the ground will only become more hard-line.

Although it is easy to dismiss outlandish claims that Morsi wants to reinstate the discriminatory jizya poll tax – essentially the equivalent of a Mafia protection racket – on Christians (the report is an uncorroborated rumor that can be traced to one obscure Arabic website), there is evidence that he would like to restrict the rights of non-Muslim minorities and women. Just under half of voters chose Ahmed Shafiq, but that will not act as a firm barrier against a gradualist approach to implementing Islamic law that many in the Brotherhood see as the ideal strategy to adopt.

In an interview with Jeffrey Goldberg in the Atlantic magazine last year, Morsi made it clear that neither he nor the Brotherhood could tolerate the idea of a Christian or woman running for the presidency of Egypt.

While much has been made of a recent announcement by an advisor to Morsi that there are plans to appoint a Copt and a woman as vice-presidents, it should be appreciated that such positions are likely to be no more than symbolic. In fact, problems of discrimination against non-Muslims and women will in all likelihood only worsen under Morsi’s presidency. Further, the spike in Salafist mob attacks on Coptic churches since the ousting of Mubarak – attacks usually sparked by the flimsiest rumors and trivialities – is unlikely to subside, and the authorities will probably continue to do nothing about it.

In the long run, chaos and instability are most likely to dominate the country’s future. Unlike Iran, which has, since the mid-1980s, implemented a major family planning program that has dramatically slowed population growth, Egypt’s population (83 million as of October 2011) continues to grow. It could reach 100 million by 2020, with more than 99 percent of the population living on an area of land around the Nile only 2.5 times the size of Israel.

Even assuming Egypt can escape from its current economic crisis, there is no sign its economy can keep up with the pace of population growth even to sustain present standards of living. The Muslim Brotherhood and other Egyptian Islamists have on past occasions denounced family planning as a Western conspiracy to keep the number of Muslims in the world in check. They have shown no intention of implementing a program to reduce the birth rate.

Egypt is unlikely to become a “Somalia on the Nile” as economist and columnist David P. Goldman has predicted, but in the long-term, internal stability is a remote possibility.

Update from June 29, 2012: Concerning Egypt’s economy and the Muslim Brotherhood’s plans, Martin Kramer summarizes the situation well:

The Muslim Brotherhood is in a bind, because it has to deliver. For the masses of people who voted for the Muslim Brotherhood, the revolution wasn’t about democracy and freedom. It was about bread and social justice.

The Brotherhood has a so-called “Renaissance” plan for the overhaul of the Egyptian economy. I won’t pretend to judge its feasibility. Could modernization of tax collection double or triple tax revenues? Can Egypt double the number of arriving tourists, even while contemplating limits on alcohol and bikinis? Can a renovation of the Suez Canal raise transit revenues from $6 billion a year to $100 billion? Can Egypt’s economy surpass the economies of Turkey and Malaysia within seven years? These are all claims made at various times by the economic thinkers of the Muslim Brotherhood, who trumpet Egypt’s supposed potential for self-sufficiency.

To these big promises, one can add Morsi’s pledge to tackle congestion problems within the first 100 days of his time in office.

Read more

Egypt’s Presidential Elections: What’s at Stake

By Raymond Ibrahim:

Egypt’s long awaited and much anticipated presidential elections—the first of their kind to take place in the nation’s 7,000 year history—are here. As we await the final results—and as the Western mainstream media fixate on images of purple-stained fingers—it is well to remember that there is much more at stake in Egypt’s elections than the mere “right” to vote.

At Egypt’s voting booths, where it tends to be easy to determine who is voting for whom, and why.

While some Egyptians are certainly voting according to their convictions, the fundamental divide revolves around religion—how much or how little the candidates in question are in favor of Islamic Sharia law. In other words, Islamists are voting for Islamists—Abdel Mon’im Abul Futuh and Muhammad Mursi—whereas non-Islamists (secularists, liberals, and non-Muslims) are voting for non-Islamists, such as Amr Musa and Ahmed Shafiq.

Bear in mind that this is not the same thing as American voters being divided between “liberal” Democrats and “conservative” Republicans; rather, this election is much more existential in nature—possibly cataclysmic for Egyptian society. For, whereas both American Republicans and Democrats operate under the selfsame U.S. Constitution, in Egypt, an Islamist president will usher in Sharia law, which will fundamentally transform the nation.

One veiled woman interviewed yesterday at the voting polls put it best: “We came to elect the man who implements Sharia (Islamic law). But I am afraid of liberals, secularists, Christians. I am afraid of their reaction if an Islamist wins. They won’t let it go easily. But God be with us.”

Interestingly, while she sums up the ultimate purpose Islamists like herself are voting—to empower “the man who implements Sharia”—she also projects her own Islamist mentality onto non-Islamists, implying that if a Sharia-friendly president is fairly elected, non-Islamists will rebel. In fact, it is the Islamists who are on record warning that if a secularist emerges as president, that itself will be proof positive that the elections were rigged, and an armed jihad will be proclaimed.

None of this is surprising, considering that Islamists have not hid their abhorrence for democracy as an infidel heresy to be exploited as a gateway to a Sharia-enforcing theocracy which will, ironically, eliminate democracy. Some have gone so far as to insist that cheating in elections to empower Sharia is an obligation. And, rather than encourage Egyptians to vote for whom they think is best suited for Egypt, days prior to these elections, various authoritative Muslim clerics and institutions decreed that Egypt’s Muslims are “obligated” to vote for Sharia-supporting Islamists, while voters are “forbidden” to vote for non-Islamists—a proclamation with threats of hellfire.

One of the blocs not voting for the Islamists consists of Christian Copts, who make for some 12-15 million people.

Read more

Related articles:

Savage Attacks by Islamists Against ‘Non-Believers’ [with VIDEOS]

by Clare Lopez:
Accounts of assault and oppression perpetrated against religious minorities in Islamic countries shock the rest of the world with their savagery but overall generally receive little attention from the mainstream media. While religious and ethnic cleansing has been a regular feature of the Islamic conquests since the time of the Muslim prophet Muhammad, the modern-day resurgence of jihad in places like Egypt, Gaza, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Nigeria, Sudan, and Somalia once again demands that the free world heed the cries of its victims.A Christian Nigerian woman, left, mourns the murder of her two sons killed by Islamic attackers.  “Faith Under Fire: The Global Threat to Religious Freedom,” a March 10, 2012, conference in Mt. Prospect, Illinois, featured a day-long program of presentations to highlight the desperate plight of Assyrians, Baha’is, Chaldeans, Copts, Jews and other indigenous faith communities targeted by majority Muslim societies under rule of Islamic law (shariah).

Directed by Eric Voogd, a tireless champion of human rights, and moderated by Fred Grandy, Executive Vice President of the Center for Security Policy (CSP) and former four-term Congressman from Iowa, Faith Under Fire was sponsored by the Center for Security Policy. Speakers and the approximately 200 attendees were connected live via the Assyrian Television and Radio outlet, “Assyrians Around the World,” which broadcast the proceedings to a worldwide audience. The Assyrian International News Agency (AINA) also covered the event as did CSP, which will post a videotape of the presentations at its online website.   

Cynthia Farahat, a Fellow at the Middle East Forum and CSP, and Dr. Ashraf Ramelah, founder and President of the Voice of the Copts, spoke movingly about the destruction and desecration of Christian cemeteries, churches, homes and monasteries in Egypt and the escalation of violent attacks against Copts that have marked the rise of the Muslim Brotherhood to power there in the bloody wake of the so-called “Arab Spring.”

Juliana Taimoorazy presented a film about the decimation of the Assyrian Christians of Iraq, one of the oldest of the original Christian communities in the Middle East that dates to the time of Christ and his Apostles. With the empowerment of Islamic forces unleashed by the 2003 U.S. invasion and subsequent 2011 withdrawal from Iraq, the Assyrians of the ancient Nineveh plain face literal extinction in the land of their ancestors as dozens have been killed and hundreds of thousands more have fled abroad in recent years.

Paul Marshall, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute’s Center for Religious Freedom and the co-author (with Nina Shea) of Silenced: How Apostasy and Blasphemy Codes are Choking Freedom Worldwide, pointed out that the publicized agenda of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), the 57-member head of state body that styles itself as the voice of the ummah, openly prioritizes the criminalization of the criticism of Islam. Shariah’s apostasy and blasphemy codes are choking freedom worldwide, not just in the OIC’s majority Muslim member states but in the non-Muslim world as well.

The Reverend Keith Roderick, an Episcopal priest who has fought for those facing religious persecution since the days of the Soviet Union, offered a slate of realistic measures that can and must be taken by the free world if a new Dark Ages under the domination of Islamic law is to be avoided. Isabelle Ishtar is a talented young singer whose performance of an original song, partly in her Assyrian mother tongue, brought the audience to its feet.

Clare Lopez, Senior Fellow at CSP, put the horrors of Islamic jihadist persecution of religious minorities into perspective, reminding the group that what is happening to these communities across the Middle East (including the latest missile barrages against the Jewish State of Israel) is not only in keeping with Islamic doctrine and law, but sadly just the newest chapter in a long and bloody history of conquest that has always been characterized by the brutal subjugation of non-Muslims.

The conference was honored with the presence of two U.S. Congressmen from Illinois: Peter Roskam, the Chief Deputy Majority Whip and fourth-ranking Republican in the House of Representatives and Joe Walsh, from the 8th District of Illinois. Roskam and Walsh spoke to policy issues and opportunities for intervention that are so crucial if the world is to avert the impending genocide that threatens minority religious communities across the Muslim Middle East.

Frank Gaffney, founder and president of CSP, addressed the group by Skype, describing the inexorable advance of shariah and the crushing oppression that Islamic law invariably imposes on non-Muslims and religious minorities wherever it succeeds in enforcement of its supremacist agenda.  

Faith Under Fire and its committed participants are determined that the exposure of what Middle Eastern minority faiths face from those who take literally the Qur’an’s invective against non-Muslims and their renewed enforcement of the ancient Pact of Umar will be just the first step in a new campaign of awareness and action.

Education and publicity about these atrocities must form but the initial basis for both non-governmental citizen activism and legislative initiatives that will bring the moral conviction of Americans’ Judeo-Christian principles to the aid and support of their brothers in faith who so desperately need them. 

Editor’s Note: Just in, at press time Suicide Bomb Kills 10 in Attack on Catholic Church in Nigeria

 

Clare Lopez is a senior fellow at the Clarion Fund and a strategic policy and intelligence expert with a focus on the Middle East, national defense and counterterrorism. Lopez began her career as an operations officer with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

Bulletin of Christian Persecution Bulletin of Christian Persecution January 29 – February 29, 2012

Produced by politicalislam.com
Publisher: Bill Warner; Edited by Asma Marwan

Bulletin of Christian Persecution

January 29 – February 29, 2012

January 29, 2012
Iran (h/t to thereligionofpeace)
Ms. Leila Mohammadi, a Christian convert who resided east of Tehran, was sentenced to two years of imprisonment after enduring 5 months of uncertainty in notorious Evin prison.

January 30, 2012
Saudi Arabia
Thirty-five Ethiopian Christians, 29 of them women, face deportation from Saudi Arabia for “illicit mingling” after police raided a private prayer gathering, Human Rights Watch said on Monday. The New York-based watchdog said the women were subjected to “unwarranted strip search,” while the men were beaten and insulted as “unbelievers”.

The group was arrested on December 15 in a private home in Jeddah as they gathered to pray ahead of Christmas in the ultra-conservative Muslim kingdom which bans the practice of any religious rites except those of Islam. More HERE.

Mid-East Arab Spring Update (hat tip to JihadWatch)

Pakistan
A judge has denied bail to a young Christian man charged with desecrating the Quran under Pakistan’s controversial blasphemy laws despite the lack of evidence against him, sources said.

Cameroon (h/t to thereligionofoeace)
Christian converts in northern Cameroon are coming under intensifying pressure following a warning from militant Muslims to return to Islam or “face Allah’s wrath”.

January 31, 2012
Macedonia
An Orthodox Christian church famed for its valuable icons was set alight in southern Macedonia overnight amid religious tension between Christians and minority Muslims over a carnival in which Orthodox Christian men dressed as women in burkas and mocked the Koran. More HERE.

Firefighters extinguished the fire on Monday night in the two century-old Sveti Nikola church, near the town of Struga. The church’s roof was destroyed but its icons were not damaged, the fire service said. And HERE.

Denmark
An Iranian apostate from Islam who became a Christian is harassed out of his Muslim neighborhood in Vollsmose, Denmark.

Egypt (h/t to JihadWatch)
Last fall, the Egyptian Coptic Church’s lawyer Naguib Gibrael estimated that some 100,000 Christian families had left the country in the preceding months, and that since Mubarak’s ouster, sectarian strife has escalated in the country.

February 1, 2012
Uganda
A [Muslim]group that claims to have executed the grisly attack on Pastor Umah Mulinde with acid on Christmas Eve seeks to broaden its evil mission and has now revealed that it is targeting more people it accuses of being bent on ostracizing Islam in their performances and sermons. They pinpoint drama groups and radio evangelists, particularly comedy group Amarula Family, Bakayimbira Dramactors, presenters on Christian radio Impact FM, other born-again leaders and non-Muslims in general.

Iran
A pastor of a major house church movement in Iran has begun serving a five years prison sentence, for “crimes against the order”, while a colleague has been detained amid drug addicts.

Pastor Behnam Irani began his five year imprisonment in the Ghezel Hesar detention center in the city of Karaj on trumped up charges, said Jason DeMars, director of advocacy group Present Truth Ministries, who assists him. “His ‘crimes’ were being a pastor and possessing Christian materials,” he explained. “In the recent past we received reports that he was being beaten by fellow prisoners with the approval of prison authorities.”

February 3, 2012
Indonesia (h/t to JihadWatch)
A group of 37 Indonesian Christians to be deported from the United States despite voicing fears of religious persecution at home are scheduled to return on Feb. 29. That group will be joined by 58 more in November.

Sudan (h/t to JihadWatch)
Sudan’s military bombed a Bible school built by a U.S. Christian aid group, prompting students and teachers at the school to run for their lives in the Nuba Mountains.

Bosnia
From JihadWatch: Radio Vatikan on Bosnia and the ethic cleansing of Catholics.

February 5, 2012
Turkey (h/t to InfidelsAreCool)
An ex-Muslim boy is beaten at his school for wearing a cross.

February 6, 2012
Islamic Countries
Ayaan Hirsi Ali writes about the global war on Christians in Islamic countries.

February 7, 2012
Islamic Countries
A video from MSNBC about violence against Christians in Islamic countries.

Iran (h/t to thereligionofpeace)
Ms. Fatemeh Nouri, an art student in one of the universities in Tehran was sentenced to one year of deprivation of education by the Revolutionary Court for believing in Christianity. Ms. Nouri is a Christian convert who was arrested by security authorities on September 2011 at her residence in east Tehran and then transferred to Evin prison.

February 8, 2012
Somalia
Islamic extremists from the rebel al Shabaab militia in Somalia beheaded a Christian on the outskirts of Mogadishu last month, sources said. The militants fighting the transitional government in Mogadishu murdered Zakaria Hussein Omar, 26, on Jan. 2 in Cee-carfiid village, about 15 kilometers outside of the Somali capital, they said. Omar had worked for a Christian humanitarian organization that al Shabaab banned last year.

Pakistan (h/t to thereligionofeace)
Haroon Arif, a student from DG Khan in Punjab, could not get high enough marks to get into medical school. This is a standard situation for many young people in the country. What’s different here is that Haroon, who missed the grade by less than 0.1%, would have earned 20 extra marks if he was Hafiz-e-Quran. He tried to claim his knowledge of the Bible was equivalent, but this made no impact.

February 9, 2012
Around the World
A comprehensive Pew Forum study last year found that Christians are persecuted in 131 countries containing 70 percent of the world’s population, out of 197 countries in the world (if Palestine, Taiwan, South Sudan, and the Vatican are included). Best estimates are that about 200 million Christians are in communities where they are persecuted.

The ratings of offending countries always put North Korea as the worst, followed by Iran, Afghanistan, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, the Maldives, Yemen, Iraq, Uzbekistan, Laos, Pakistan, Sudan, and, farther back but still prominently odious, Libya, Syria, Oman, Egypt, Kuwait, the Palestinian Authority, Vietnam, Cuba, and China. While there is no shortage of incidents in India, where there is serious religious friction between Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs as well, most offending countries are Islamic or Communist.

Egypt
Last week a series of meetings were held by radical Muslims to decide on the fate of the Copts in a village in Alexandria, and Muslims insisted that the whole Coptic population of 62 families must be deported because of an unsubstantiated accusation levied against one Coptic man. Update HERE.

Nigeria (h/t to Persecution.org)
Nigerians have fled in droves to neighbouring Cameroon to escape violence claimed by the Islamist Boko Haram group and revenge attacks by Christians. “Everybody is insecure in Nigeria. The fear is all-pervading,” said a Nigerian Christian priest, speaking on condition of anonymity, in Fotokol, a Cameroonian border town where dozens have taken shelter in the last few weeks.

February 10, 2012
Around the World
Muslim Persecution of Christians in January 2012. The beginning of the New Year saw only an increase in the oppression of Christians under Islam, from Nigeria, where an all-out jihad has been declared in an effort to eradicate the Muslim north of all Christians, to Europe, where Muslim converts to Christianity are still hounded and attacked as apostates.

According to the Chairman of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, “The flight of Christians out of the region is unprecedented and it’s increasing year by year”; in our life time alone, he predicts “Christians might disappear altogether from Iraq, Afghanistan, and Egypt.”

Iran
Iranian authorities this week arrested Christian converts from Islam while they were meeting for worship at a home in the southern city of Shiraz, according to sources. The sources put the number of the arrested Christians, who belong to one of Iran’s many underground house churches, at between six and 10. More HERE.

February 12, 2012
Nigeria (h/t to thereligionofpeace)
A Mitsubishi bus with six Christian passengers fleeing the carnage in Maiduguri took the chance of refuelling at Potiskum. Hardly had the attendant started the pump than some men on motorbikes, armed with AK 47, pulled in. They shot dead the travellers, including a woman and a baby.

February 14, 2012
Algeria (h/t to JihadWatch)
Armed men raided a church in Ouargla, Algeria on Wednesday tearing down the gate to the church’s compound and damaging the iron crucifix on the church’s roof.

Aidan Clay, ICC Regional Manager for the Middle East, said, “Whether under the harsh laws imposed on Christians by the government or at the hands of angry mobs, Christians and their places of worship continue to be discriminated against or outright attacked in Algeria. We urge officials in the Ouargla province of Algeria to conduct an immediate investigation and arrest those responsible.”

Turkey
Despite some promising developments, Christians in Turkey continue to suffer attacks from private citizens, discrimination by lower-level government officials and vilification in both school textbooks and news media, according to a study by a Protestant group. In its annual “Report on Human Rights Violations,” released in January, the country’s Association of Protestant Churches notes mixed indicators of improvement but states that there is a “root of intolerance” in Turkish society toward adherents of non-Islamic faiths.

February 15, 2012
Egypt
A mob of nearly 20,000 radical Muslims, mainly Salafis, attempted this evening to break into and torch the Church of St. Mary and St. Abram in the village of Meet Bashar,in Zagazig, Sharqia province. They were demanding the death of Reverend Guirgis Gameel, pastor of the church, who has been unable to leave his home since yesterday.

Nearly 100 terrorized Copts sought refuge inside the church, while Muslim rioters were pelting the church with stones in an effort to break into the church, assault the Copts and torch the building. A home of a Copt living near the church and the home of the church’s porter were torched, as well as three cars.

Sudan
Two Catholic priests abducted at gunpoint in Rabak, Sudan last month have been released amid a wave of forcible conscriptions into rebel southern militias.

February 18, 2012
Pakistan
(h/t to AtlasShrugs)
Nadia Bibi, a Christian girl who was abducted and forced to marry a Muslim man, returned to her family, of Catholic faith, after 10 years. Nadia was only 15 when, in 2001, she was kidnapped in Mariamabad (in Punjab), a city with a Catholic majority: her case is not an isolated case, as confirmed by Catholic sources of Fides in Punjab, there are at least 700 cases a year of Christian girls kidnapped and forced to marry a Muslim.

February 19, 2012
Jerusalem (h/t to Janet Levy)
A mob of some 50 Palestinian Muslims stoned a group of Christian tourists atop Jerusalem’s Temple Mount on Sunday morning. Three of the Israeli police officers who acted to protect the Christian group were wounded by the stone-throwers. Police arrested 11 Palestinians, several of them minors, for their role in the attack. The attack is believed to have been instigated by the former Muslim mufti of Jerusalem, Ekrama Sabri.

Kuwait (h/t to JihadWatch)
A Kuwaiti parliamentarian is set to submit a draft law banning the construction of churches and non-Islamic places of worship in the Gulf state, it was reported at the weekend.

Nigeria (h/t to JihadWatch)
A bomb planted by an abandoned car exploded outside a church in the middle of a worship service Sunday near Nigeria’s capital, wounding five people amid a continuing wave of violence by a radical Islamist sect, authorities and witnesses said.

No one immediately claimed responsibility for the blast outside the Christ Embassy church in Suleja, a city near the nation’s capital Abuja. However, the area has been targeted in the past by the sect known as Boko Haram – including the Christmas Day car bombing of a Catholic church nearby that killed at least 44 people. More HERE.

February 22, 2012
Iran
A trial court in Iran has issued its final verdict, ordering a Christian pastor to be put to death for leaving Islam and converting to Christianity, according to sources close to the pastor and his legal team.

Supporters fear Youcef Nadarkhani, a 34-year-old father of two who was arrested over two years ago on charges of apostasy, may now be executed at any time without prior warning, as death sentences in Iran may be carried out immediately or dragged out for years.

Syria
“Christians are the minority most threatened by Syria’s civil war and are trying to flee the country. They feel defenceless against the escalation of violence that has raged in the country for months. Pray for peace and the reconciliation of the Syrian people!” Mgr Antoine Audo, Caldean archbishop of Aleppo, told AsiaNews.

February 23, 2012
Pakistan
Saira Khokhar, who teaches at the City Foundation School in Lahore, is accused of burning a copy of the Qur’an. However, the case is still shrouded in mystery. Police took Ms Khokhar into custody and launched an informal investigation. No First Information Report has been filed yet, but Christian activists and organisation along with the special adviser to the prime minister on minority affairs, Paul Bhatti, are closely monitoring developments to ensure her safety and rights.

Pakistan
A dozen armed Muslims stormed the Grace Ministry Church in Faisalabad, seriously wounding two Christians. Sajid Masih was hit by bullets and is in critical condition in hospital, the man risks having his amputated arm. Another member of the Protestant community, Boota Masih, was pushed from the roof – a height of about six meters – after being struck repeatedly with a rifle butt.

February 24, 2012
Pakistan
A rich Muslim landowner abducted a Christian man in Faisalabad for failure to repay a debt he had contracted and not repaid whilst working for him. Sources close to the Christian man’s family said the latter left the job tired of being exploited and abused for a pittance. Only the intervention of the National Commission for Justice and Peace of the Catholic Church of Pakistan led to the man’s release and a peaceful resolution of the issue.

Egypt
Coptic Christians in Egypt fear for their future under an Islamist government.

February 26, 2012
Nigeria (h/t to Persecution.org)
Fear and anxiety gripped churchgoers in Nigeria on Sunday after four people were killed in the latest church attack. Police said a car packed with explosives rammed into the compound of the Cocin (Church of Christ) headquarters in Jos. Some church members emerged from the scene covered in dust.

Syria
For the first time in the history of the conflict in Syria, an armed attack has been made on a Catholic monastery, reported Vatican Radio on Saturday. About 30 armed men wearing masks attacked the monastery, founded by Jesuit from Italy Paolo dell’Olio. Attackers demanded money and weapons. According to the abbot, no one was killed or wounded.

February 27, 2012
Pakistan
Tensions are still high in a village near here following Muslims’ attempt to seize land from a Christian family by threatening to accuse them of “blasphemy.” What began on Feb. 19 as a quarrel over a pigeon between Christian and Muslim youths at Nawa Pind Sabu Mohal village, in Sialkot’s Pasroor area in northeast Punjab Province, grew into an occasion to jail some Christians in the overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim country, the Christians said.

February 28, 2012
Uganda
While a Ugandan pastor was fighting to retain sight in his remaining eye after an acid attack, Muslim extremists this month were shooting at his close friend, a leader of another church.

Doctors at Sheba Hospital in Tel-Aviv, Israel, are still not sure what kind of chemicals Muslim extremists cast on Bishop Umar Mulinde of Gospel Life Church International outside of Kampala last Christmas Eve, but they know that the acid is threatening the vision in his remaining eye.

February 29, 2012
Egypt (h/t to JihadWatch)
A number of Egypt Coptic Christian protesters organized a demonstration on Tuesday in front of Parliament to protest what they called “the disappearance and abduction of Coptic girls,” where the families of the missing girls took part in the protest organized by the Association of Victims of Abduction and Enforced Disappearance. The protesters chanted “Where is the rule of law” and “no for the Islamization of minors”,”MPS, where are the rights of Copts?”

Bangladesh (h/t to JihadWatch)
Three American missionaries were injured in northern Bangladesh on Wednesday after their car was attacked by a mob who suspected they were converting Muslims into Christians, police said.

Pakistan (h/t to thereligionofpeace)
Gunmen abducted two Pakistani Christians working for a South Korean-run hospital in Karachi on Wednesday, police said.