Egypt’s New Constitution: As Bad as its Old One?

by Michael Armanious:

Amr Moussa, chairman of the committee tasked with amending the Islamist constitution, talked about how the new constitution guarantees that Egypt will have a “civilian government” and promote the creation of a “democratic and modern country.”

But he did not promise that it would be a secular one. Moussa asserts that the new constitution bans the creation of parties based on religion, but it gives Egypt’s theocrats-in-waiting a way to get around the ban on by allowing parties to be established on “Islamic reference”; and Article Two remains.

“In Egypt, a civil state means a modern nationalist state that is compatible with Islamist provisions.” — Ali Gomaa, Egypt’s former Grand Mufti.

Egypt’s interim president Adly Mansour has set January 14 and 15, 2014, as the dates for a referendum on the country’s amended constitution.

Amr Moussa – the chairman of the (fifty-member) Committee of Fifty tasked with amending the 2012 Islamist constitution – appeared in multiple televised interviews to tell about the importance of the new amended constitution for the future of Egypt. He talked about how the new constitution guarantees that Egypt will have a “civilian government” and will promote the creation of a “democratic and modern country.” He stressed that Egypt will have no military or theocratic government. He also listed several articles that will guarantee freedom for Egyptians, including freedom of religion and freedom of expression.

A closer look at the constitution itself reveals that it is not the freedom-promoting document Moussa describes it as being.

 

Amr Moussa, pictured here at a 2013 World Economic Forum conference, says that Egypt’s proposed constitution will not allow for a military or theocratic government. (Image source: World Economic Forum / Benedikt von Loebell)

The amended constitution still includes Article Two of the previous constitution, which states that Islam is Egypt’s religion and that the “principles” of the Islamic Sharia law are the country’s main source of legislation. This clearly puts Egypt’s religious minorities, most notably the Coptic Christians, in a position of extreme vulnerability. When this was pointed out, Moussa stated that there was nothing to be done because the article had been approved unanimously by the Committee of Fifty, which included Coptic leaders. What Moussa failed to report, however, was that a Copt who served on the Committee of Fifty openly admitted on national television that he had caved into the demands of Islamists who want to turn Egypt into an Islamic theocracy.

Retaining Article Two is not the only problem with the constitution. It also places Egypt’s military beyond civilian oversight, rendering the phrase “civilian government” meaningless. This condition is a huge problem: Egypt’s armed forces have amassed an enormous and independent economic empire which includes gas stations, banquet halls, construction operations, factories, and vast tracts of land. Consequently, Egyptian generals are the feudal lords of modern Egypt; their underlings are their squires and scribes, and those outside the military are turned into defenseless peasants.

This arrangement is solidified by another part of the constitution that allows Egyptian civilians to be tried in a military court. In an effort to allay fear over this, Moussa stressed that civilians can only be tried in a military court in specific kinds of cases – when someone attacks a military buildings or equipment, for example.

But Major General Medhat Radwan Gazi, chief of military justice, contradicted Mr. Moussa. Gazi confirmed that disputes between civilians and the operators of military owned-businesses could be settled by a military court to protect the officers or soldiers who work and manage these businesses.

Gazi also said that there is no difference between an officer defending the country in a tank or pumping gas or managing a gas station. They are all officers of the armed forces, so any dispute with the public will be tried in military court. In sum, the proposed constitution entrenches a modern-day system of feudalism in the land of the Nile.

This plan is a disaster. Egypt has been under military rule for over 61 years, and emergency laws have been used for over 32 years of its recent history. Thousands of civilians have been tried and convicted in military courts for all kinds of charges. Gazi confirmed that the armed forces will continue governing Egypt for the foreseeable future.

One would think that in exchange for cementing the status of Egypt’s generals as modern-day Pharaohs, the new constitution would at least protect Egyptian citizens from an onslaught of theocratic extremism. It does not.

Moussa asserts that the new constitution bans the establishment of political parties based on religion, such as the Muslim Brotherhood, but it gives Egypt’s theocrats-in-waiting a way to get around this ban by allowing parties to be established on “Islamic reference.”

What is the difference? So far, 11 parties have already followed this path, including the Hizb El-Benaa Wa El-Tanmia, and the Al Nour Party.

Read more at Gatestone Institute

 

Obama Accused of ‘Crimes Against Humanity’

OBAMA-articleLargeby :

According to Egyptian newspaper El Watan, a group of Egyptian lawyers has submitted a complaint charging U.S. president Barrack Hussein Obama with crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court.

The complaint charges Obama of being an accessory to the Muslim Brotherhood, which incited widespread violence in Egypt both before and after the June 30 Revolution.

Along with Obama, the complaint reproduced by El Watan mentions several Brotherhood members by name, beginning with the leader of the organization Muhammad Badie, and other top ranking leaders such as Mohamed al-Beltagy, Essam al-Erian, and Safwat Hegazi, adding that “Obama cooperated, incited, and assisted the armed elements of the Muslim Brotherhood in the commission of crimes against humanity in the period from 3/7/2013-8/18/2013, in the Arab Republic of Egypt.”

According to the published text, the complaint begins by quoting Article 7/1 of the Statute of the International Criminal Court, titled “Crimes against humanity,” which is reproduced below:

Article 7

Crimes against humanity

1. For the purpose of this Statute, “crime against humanity” means any of the following

acts when committed as part of a widespread or systematic attack directed against

any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack:

(a) Murder;

(b) Extermination;

(c) Enslavement;

(d) Deportation or forcible transfer of population;

(e) Imprisonment or other severe deprivation of physical liberty in violation of fundamental rules of international law;

(f) Torture;

(g) Rape, sexual slavery, enforced prostitution, forced pregnancy, enforced

sterilization, or any other form of sexual violence of comparable gravity;

(h) Persecution against any identifiable group or collectivity on political, racial,

national, ethnic, cultural, religious, gender as defined in paragraph 3, or other

grounds that are universally recognized as impermissible under international

law, in connection with any act referred to in this paragraph or any crime

within the jurisdiction of the Court;

(i) Enforced disappearance of persons;

(j) The crime of apartheid;

(k) Other inhumane acts of a similar character intentionally causing great

suffering, or serious injury to body or to mental or physical health.

Next, the complaint shows how Muslim Brotherhood leadership violated some of the above definitions, for example, by torturing, mutilating, raping, and killing Egyptians in their “sit in” camps (first reported here), with a highlight on the role the Brotherhood played in inciting violence and the killing of peaceful protesters around Itthadiya Palace back in December.

Above and beyond the accusations of crimes against humanity that the lawyer-drafted complaint cited by El Watan levels against the Brotherhood, one need only look to the fate of Egypt’s Christian minority, who were especially targeted by the Muslim Brotherhood—and thus, by extension, their supporter, Obama—to see numerous examples of nearly every aforementioned definition of crimes against humanity, as follows:

Read more with video

Murdered Christian Children: The Price of Obama’s Pro-Brotherhood Jihad

by Raymond Ibrahim:

Who is more deserving of punishment by the United States?  Millions of Egyptians, for ousting the Muslim Brotherhood?  Or the Muslim Brotherhood, for habitually terrorizing and murdering Christians, among many other crimes?

Murdered Marys

According to the unmistakably clear actions of the Obama administration, it is the millions of anti-Brotherhood Egyptians who deserve punishment.

Last Sunday, the Church of the Virgin Mary in Waraq near Cairo was attacked during a wedding ceremony, leaving four dead and many wounded.  According to Dr. Hisham Abdul Hamid of forensics, two of those who were murdered were Christian children—two girls; two Marys:  12-year-old Mary Nabil Fahmy, who took five shots in the chest, and 8-year-old Mary Ashraf Masih (meaning “Christ”), who took a bullet in the back which burst from the front.

It should be noted that this scene—attacked Coptic churches and murdered Christians, especially on holy days and celebrations—has become a normalized aspect of Egypt’s landscape (see Crucified Again: Exposing Islam’s New War on Christians, especially pgs. 42-43 and 56-62).

So too are the murders of Christian children increasingly common in Egypt.  Indeed, along with Sunday’s two murdered Marys, back in July, another Christian girl, 10-year-old Jessi Boulos, was shot dead while walking home from Bible class.

All of these church attacks and murders are a direct byproduct of the Muslim Brotherhood’s incitements against Egypt’s Christians in retaliation for the June 30 Revolution, which saw the ousting of the Brotherhood.

Needing someone to scapegoat in order to set Egypt ablaze, Brotherhood leadership—including supreme leader Muhammad Badie, Safwat Hegazi, and Al Jazeera’s Sheikh Yusuf Qaradawi—repeatedly demonized the nation’s Christian minority, leading to any number ofatrocities committed against the Copts.

As today’s headline from one of Egypt’s most read newspapers, Tahrir News, put it: “The Brotherhood’s crime in Waraq [location of Sunday’s church attack].  Seventeen murdered Copts and 85 torched churches since ousting of Morsi… Copts pay price of June 30 Revolution.”

Now consider the response of the United States concerning the conflict between Egypt and the Muslim Brotherhood in the context of U.S. aid.

For years, human rights activists have been imploring the Obama administration to make aid to Egypt contingent on respect for the human rights of all Egyptians, including Christian minorities.  Such a move would dramatically ameliorate the plight of the Copts, since all potential Egyptian governments, including the ousted Muslim Brotherhood, are more interested in securing money than in killing Christians.

Instead, the Obama administration’s approach has been 1) to ignore the plight of Egypt’s Christians and 2) when attacks are especially egregious (and exposed by the MSM) offer perfunctory condemnation.  (After all, if the administration was able to get away with the lip-service approach among Americans—vocally condemning and promising to get the Muslim Brotherhood-linked murderers of Americans in Benghazi but then ignoring it—surely it will not hesitate doing so with a foreign nation.)

As for making U.S. aid to Egypt contingent on respect for human rights, the Obama administration has been idle.

On the other hand, when those who are responsible for the destruction of nearly 100 Christian churches (including an unprecedented attack on the holiest Coptic church back when Morsi was still president) and the murders of Copts and their children finally get ousted by the Egyptian people and their military, it is then that the Obama administration moves and punishes, cutting hundreds of millions in aid to Egypt in direct response to the ouster of the Muslim Brotherhood (in other nations, like Syria, the administration supports the Christian-slaughtering, al-Qaeda linked terrorists).

What more proof can any sensible American need to know that the Muslim-named president of the United States is in league with Muslim terrorists?

 

Congressional Delegation Declares Solidarity with Egypt Against Terrorism

1240239_10201825408419897_1709016101_nWASHINGTON, Sept. 8, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Coptic Solidarity and its Egyptian secular allies and friends, are pleased to inform the public of the success of a visit by a bipartisan Congressional delegation to Egypt to strengthen the relationship between the American People and Egypt and to deepen the US-Egyptian alliance against terrorism and extremism. The delegation included Republican and Democratic Representatives Dana Rohrabacher, Michele Bachmann, Louie Golmert, Dana Edward, Steve King, Steve Stockman, Robert Pittenger, and Louis Franklin.

The delegation met with Interim President Mansour, minister of Defense General al-Sisi, and members of the cabinet, and visited the Pope Tadraous, spiritual leader of the Coptic Church. They had excellent meetings and assured Egypt’s leaders that a majority in the US Congress stands firmly with Egyptians against terrorism and extremism and reject the violence and radical ideology of the Muslim Brotherhood.

The delegation visited burned churches and expressed its horror at the damages and victims at the hands of Muslim Brotherhood militias and Jihadi Terrorists. Pope Tawadros told the delegation that “the community paid a dear price, dozens of churches were burned down, but if these sacrifices help in bringing freedom to Egypt, we consent.” The delegation assured the Pope that Congress would do all it can to support the Egyptian people, the Coptic community and to all civil society moderates in Egypt.

Three leaders from the delegation, Representatives Michele Bachmann, Louie Gohmert and Steve King held a joint Press briefer at the Egyptian American Chamber and declared their “full support to Egypt’s people, Government and revolution, in confronting the terror and oppression of the Muslim Brotherhood.” Congresswoman Michele Bachmann said “we are with you people of Egyptagainst the common threat, the Muslim Brotherhood. We have diversity of opinion in Washington, but be sure the people of Egyptare standing with Egypt against the Brotherhood terror.” Congressman Gohmert said “we were opposed to send military assistance to the Muslim Brotherhood regime before your revolution, but now we will work on getting all military assistance needed to fight the Jihadists and the Terrorists.” Congressman King said “we will work on an economic partnership between the US and Egypt and make sure you move forward to a stage of democracy and economic success.” The press briefer can be viewed here:

In Washington, Dr Walid Phares, Co-Secretary General of the Transatlantic Parliamentary Group and advisor to members of the US Congress and the European Parliament on Middle East affairs said “this delegation brought hope to Egyptians that the American public stands firmly with the democratic revolution, support the aspirations of the 30 million Egyptians who marched for freedom and is a partner in the struggle against Terrorism.” Phares said, “Egyptian Americans have worked hard to insure the success of a Congressional initiative to Egypt. The Coptic Solidarity Conference held in June on Capitol Hill was supported by many members of Congress, some of whom in fact were part of the delegation to Egypt. That Conference triggered several meetings and initiatives that inspired the formation of this delegation. The presence of Egyptian secular leaders at the Coptic Solidarity Conference inWashington also helped convincing Congressional leaders that what later happened in Egypt wasn’t a coup, but a real popular revolution.”

Coptic Solidarity will continue to help building positive relationships between the US Congress and Egypt as well as between European legislatures and the Egyptian people.

Coptic Solidarity is non-profit organization dedicated to leading efforts to achieve equal citizenship for the Copts in Egypt. For more information, contact Hal Meawad 240-644-5153, or info@copticsolidarity.org

Egyptian Anti-Terror & Counterpropaganda Riot on Obama’s Facebook Page!

anti-terror-rally-by Cynthia Farahat:

Where was the MSM when Egyptians went on the largest anti-terrorism rally in the history of the world last July 26th? When millions of peaceful protestors took the streets to publicly announce to the world that they authorize the military and police to fight Muslim Brotherhood (MB) terrorists and their al-Qaeda operatives?

I’m certainly not surprised that the Obama regime is siding with the MB and al-Qaeda militants that have declared total war on Egypt, as I reported last July, where MB terrorists stated that they will burn Christians alive, set Egypt on fire, and kill military officials, as MSM and this administration shamelessly calls the murders with automatic rifles and machetes, “demonstrators!”

While al-Qaeda and MB terrorists are currently fulfilling their promises of mass murder and pyromania in the greatest wave of pre-planned organized terror in the history of Egypt, that has been ongoing since Morsi’s installation in power and intensified in the past fifty days reaching its peak on August 14th, only few Western media outlets support Egypt’s lonely war on MB terrorists, but I will be discussing this in a different post.

But now here are some interesting developments and facts that the detached statist Soviet-style propaganda machine fails to comprehend: Egyptians ousted two presidents in two years, thus, they no longer tolerate tyranny, disinformation, third-world propaganda, terror and fascism, after they broke the silence of sixty years of horrific oppression and segregation.

And since the anti-terror protest were ignored, it has moved to Barack Obama’s official Facebook page, where thousands of Egyptians flood the comment section with in a massive counterpropaganda campaign that repudiates his support for MB terrorist and al-Qaeda affiliates, sometime in disagreeable and angry comments! How about that for a “New Beginning?”

Morsi Constitution Modification will Sabotage Pro-Democracy Efforts

20121213_morsi_yelling_-_LARGEby ASHRAF RAMELAH:

Adly Mansour, Egypt’s Interim President, has chosen to begin Egypt’s conversion to democracy by reinstating and modifying ousted President Morsi’s controversial 2012 Islamic Shariah constitution. Finalized just five months ago and widely rejected by Egyptians (more than 70 percent) but somehow approved through a referendum vote, this dream-come-true for Islamists was the leading cause of Morsi’s overthrow.

Remember as well that a historic verdict by Egypt’s judiciary dismissed the constitutional assembly working on the 2012 constitution draft because the assembly was dominated by Muslim Brotherhood and Salafi mainly interested in a religious agenda.

This time around, there is no debate that Egypt must have a new constitution before elections are held. This is a good sign. However, using Morsi’s constitution indicates that religionists and possibly terrorists are already at the table. Compromises at this level to please Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood, Salafis, and jihadists show a disregard of the commitment to honor the Egyptian goals of liberty, equality, and human rights.

Building on a foundation of religious bias, sex discrimination and denigration of human rights is a rejection of liberty and equality and obstructs democracy

The 2012 constitution is based upon the supremacy of Egypt’s majority religion and its penetrating influence of the daily life and livelihood of citizens. Religious mandates by clerics turned into civil law and enforced by the police negate freedom and individual rights, the basic precepts of democracy. So why start with Morsi’s constitution?

Repeating SCAF’s same mistake

The miraculous second chance Egypt has now to do it right means that leaders right now must abstain from doing what SCAF did after the overthrow of Mubarak. SCAF listened to Islamist factions; some, like the Muslim Brotherhood, covering up their real views with democratic slogans, and some, like Salafi, directing anti-democratic religionist concepts to become part of the democratic process.

Please do not burden us, Mr. Mansour, with any wasteful pursuits brought about by compromises with political-religious factions. This particular task is above religious politics. Egyptians have suffered immeasurably to create this path for democracy in Egypt. Egyptian citizens are not power-seekers like those who seek to adulterate freedom’s first principles in the construction of a democratic constitution.

Best for no faiths to take part — no religious representatives in Egypt’s new constitutional assembly for a fresh start

Egyptian Interim President Adly Mansour would be wise to start from scratch the process of writing a democratic constitution bringing together pro-democracy Tamarud representatives and others interested in realizing the objectives of their freedom-seeking goals without adverse influences.

The religious in Egypt will be equally free to worship once a secular constitution with democratic freedoms is put in place. This should happen as soon as possible.

Read more: Family Security Matters

 

Qaradawi Comments Seen as Fatwa Against Egyptian Army

images (83)by IPT News:

Blow to Radical Islam Worldwide if U.S. Tells Morsi to Go

An anti-Morsi poster and protester. (Photo: © Reuters)

An anti-Morsi poster and protester. (Photo: © Reuters)

By Tawfik Hamid:

After one year of Muslim Brotherhood member Mohammed Morsi’s presidency, millions  of Egyptians-in an unprecedented scene-poured into the streets of Cairo to say NO to Political Islam. This is probably the first time since 9/11 that Egyptians have dared to publicly reject Political and Radical Islam in such huge numbers.

U.S. support for Mohammed Morsi now appears to be pointless as the vast majority of  the population is turning against him. It would seem his collapse is inevitable.

Any attempt by the US to push the military to support Morsi is a form of suicide for the military as literally tens of millions are turning against him, while only tens of thousands are remaining loyal. Additionally, the Egyptian military-which has the support of more than 80% of Egyptians, according to recent surveys-is people-based and not sectarian. This simply means that the military itself may collapse if does not reject Morsi. And if that were to happen, the US would lose the ONLY ally in the country that can protect the Suez Canal and respect the peace treaty with Israel.

Some may argue that the US needs to support the ballot results. On the surface this may seem reasonable. But is the principle of democratic elections more important than the democratic values it is designed to protect? Are election results more important than such democratic values such as respect for minorities, equality of citizens, and the rule of law? President Morsi has made a mockery of these basic values.

Read more at The Clarion Project

For live updates follow:

The Muslim Brotherhood Has Turned Cairo Into A Dystopia [PHOTOS]

this-is-the-headquarters-for-the-muslim-brotherhood-in-cairo-the-new-ruling-party-responsible-for-law-and-order-throughout-egyptWhen Egyptians took to the streets to overthrow an oppressive government in 2011, the world was on their side.

But in the two years that followed, as Arab Spring turned to Arab Winter, and Egyptians fell under the rule of the oppressive new government of Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, the world has looked away.

This is what Egyptians told us when we visited Cairo at the end of March 2013.

Many disillusioned Egyptians say things are worse than ever. Thugs often run the streets, crime rates have skyrocketed, and police feel they’re outgunned, faced with the flood of weapons filling Cairo’s streets.

Making matters worse, everything from utilities to gasoline is both more expensive and more difficult to acquire than it was before the Muslim Brotherhood.
See the heartbreaking photo gallery showing the tragic state of Egypt at Business Insider

Kerry says US releasing millions in aid to Egypt #Feckless #ArmingOurEnemies

Kerry-Morsi-620x402CAIRO (AP) – U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Sunday rewarded Egypt for President Mohammed Morsi’s pledges of political and economic reforms by releasing $250 million in American aid to support the country’s “future as a democracy.”

Yet Kerry also served notice that the Obama administration will keep close watch on how Morsi, who came to power in June as Egypt’s first freely elected president, honors his commitment and that additional U.S. assistance would depend on it.

“The path to that future has clearly been difficult and much work remains,” Kerry said in a statement after wrapping up two days of meetings in Egypt, a deeply divided country in the wake of the revolution that ousted longtime President Hosni Mubarak.

Egypt is trying to meet conditions to close on a $4.8 billion loan package from the International Monetary Fund. An agreement would unlock more of the $1 billion in U.S. assistance promised by President Barack Obama last year and set to begin flowing with Kerry’s announcement.

“The United States can and wants to do more,” Kerry said. “Reaching an agreement with the IMF will require further effort on the part of the Egyptian government and broad support for reform by all Egyptians. When Egypt takes the difficult steps to strengthen its economy and build political unity and justice, we will work with our Congress at home on additional support.”

Kerry cited Egypt’s “extreme needs” and Morsi’s “assurances that he plans to complete the IMF process” when he told the president that the U.S. would provide $190 million of a long-term $450 million pledge “in a good-faith effort to spur reform and help the Egyptian people at this difficult time.” The release of the rest of the $450 million and the other $550 million tranche of the $1 billion that Obama announced will be tied to successful reforms, officials said.

Read more

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Egypt: Free People Not Going Quietly Into the Sharia Night

4490204-3x2-700x4671By Robert Spencer

Survey after survey, as well as the election results that put the Muslim Brotherhood’s Mohammed Morsi in the presidential palace, show that most Egyptians want Islamic law. But those who do not are not submitting quietly to Sharia tyranny.

Morsi has declared a state of emergency and given the military the power to arrest civilian protesters, yet still the anti-Morsi demonstrations continue. And while he quickly endorsed the demonstrations against Hosni Mubarak that ultimately led to the Muslim Brotherhood’s ascent to power, Barack Obama has been reticent about supporting these demonstrations, as he was in 2009 when thousands of Iranians took to the streets to protest against the mullahcracy.

But aren’t these “pro-democracy” protesters? After all, Morsi has been notably inhospitable to dissent, arresting his critics and overseeing the adoption of a constitution that Egyptian Christians fear will be used to deny them basic rights, in accord with Sharia provisions institutionalizing discrimination against non-Muslims. Videos have come to light in which he lashed out against Jews with venomous hatred, referring to Qur’anic curses of them as “apes and pigs” and declaring that there could be no negotiations with Israel.

Those who are protesting against his regime, on the other hand, are in favor of genuine democratic rule, without Sharia restrictions on the freedom of speech and its denial of equality of rights to large segments of the popular.

Yet Obama is silent. The only two mass popular uprisings in Muslim countries that he has not supported have one thing in common: both have been against pro-Sharia Islamic supremacist regimes. All the popular uprisings he has supported, meanwhile, have resulted in the installation of pro-Sharia Islamic supremacist regimes.

One might be pardoned for thinking that Obama is in favor of pro-Sharia Islamic supremacist regimes. In any case, so are most Egyptians: a Pew Research Center survey conducted in Spring 2010, before the chimerical “Arab Spring” and the toppling of Mubarak, found that no fewer than eighty-five percent of Egyptians thought that Islam was a positive influence in politics. Fifty-nine percent said they identified with “Islamic fundamentalists” in their struggle against “groups who want to modernize the country,” who had the support of only twenty-seven percent of Egyptians. Only twenty percent were “very concerned” about “Islamic extremism” within Egypt.

Another survey in May 2012 found little difference. 61 percent of Egyptians stated that they wanted to see Egypt abandon its peace treaty with Israel, and the same number identified the hardline Islamic kingdom of Saudi Arabia as the country that should serve as Egypt’s model for the role Islam should play in government. 60 percent said that Egypt’s laws should hew closely to the directives of the Qur’an.

Yet these surveys show that a substantial minority in Egypt does not want Sharia, and the demonstrations this week demonstrate that they’re determined to make a stand. They oppose the new Egyptian constitution that, as the Associated Press reported, “largely reflects the conservative vision of the Islamists, with articles that rights activists, liberals and Christians fear will lead to restrictions on the rights of women and minorities and civil liberties in general.” They have every reason to be concerned, for the constitution reflects in numerous particulars Sharia restrictions on their rights. AP noted that the constitution’s wording “could give Islamists the tool for insisting on stricter implementation of rulings of Shariah.”

Read more at Front Page

A ‘Sudanese Genocide’ in Egypt?

Egypt-Christians-AP-450x337By Raymond Ibrahim

The current tensions in Egypt between the Muslim Brotherhood-led government and a fragmented populace that includes large segments of people who oppose the Islamization of Egypt—the moderates, secularists, and Christians who recently demonstrated in mass at Tahrir Square and even besieged the presidential palace—is all too familiar.  One need only look to Egypt’s immediate neighbor, Sudan, and its bloody history, to know where the former may be headed.

The civil war in Sudan, which saw the deaths of millions, was fundamentally a byproduct of an Islamist regime trying to push Sharia law on large groups of Sudanese—Muslim, Christian, and polytheist—who refused to be governed by Allah’s law, who refused to be Islamized.   Although paying lip-service to pluralism and equality in the early years, by 1992, the Islamist government of Khartoum declared a formal jihad on the south and the Nuba, citing a fatwa by Sudan’s Muslim authorities which declared that “An insurgent who was previously a Muslim is now an apostate; and a non-Muslim is a non-believer standing as a bulwark against the spread of Islam, and Islam has granted the freedom of killing both of them.”

In other words, Khartoum decreed that: 1) It is simply trying to do Allah’s will by instituting Islamic Sharia law; 2) Any Sudanese who objects—including Muslims—is obviously an infidel; 3) All such infidels must be eliminated.  Accordingly, countless people were butchered, raped, and enslaved—all things legitimate once an Islamic states declares a jihad.  While South Sudan recently ceded, the Nuba Mountains in the north is still continuously being bombarded.

Now consider how the above pattern—false promises of religious freedom, followed by a Sharia push and a declaration that anyone opposing it, including Muslims, are infidels and apostates to be killed—is precisely what has been going on directly to the north of Sudan, in Egypt.

First, although Muhammad Morsi repeatedly promised that he would be a president who represents “all Egyptians”  during presidential elections, mere months after coming to power, he showed that his true interest—which should have been obvious from the start, considering that he is a Muslim Brotherhood leader—was to Sharia and Islamization.

Even so, Egyptians did not forget that Morsi, during presidential elections, had said the following in a video interview:

The Egyptian people are awake and alert—Muslims and Christians; and they know that, whoever comes [to become Egypt’s president], and does not respect the rule of law and the Constitution, the people will go against him. I want the people immediately to go against me, if I ever do not respect the law and Constitution.

Accordingly, when Morsi aggrandized himself with unprecedented presidential powers, and then used these powers to sidestep the law and push a Sharia-heavy Constitution on Egypt, large segments of the Egyptian people did rise against him; at one point, he even had to flee the presidential palace.

And just as in Sudan, Morsi’s Islamist allies—who, like Morsi, during elections spoke glowingly of Egyptian unity—made it a point to portray all those Egyptians opposing Morsi, the majority of whom were Muslims, of opposing Islam, of being apostates and hypocrites, and thus enemies who should be fought and killed.

Read more at Front Page

 

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People Do Vote For Tyranny

Demonstrations during the Iranian revolution, 1979

Demonstrations during the Iranian revolution, 1979

by Clare Lopez:  As the world watches and waits for the Egyptian people to vote in a nationwide referendum to be held December 15 on a new constitution drafted largely by the Muslim Brotherhood, it would be well to consider another constitutional referendum from 33 years ago when another people who’d just been through a revolution went to the polls and cast their votes firmly in favor of tyranny.On October 24, 1979, after a tumultuous year of revolution, the Iranian people turned out by the millions and voted overwhelmingly (over 98%) to approve a new constitution that subjugated the country to the rule of Islamic Law under the leadership of a single man – the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini – an Islamic cleric with unlimited power.

The vote was no snap response, as the full text of the new Iranian constitution had been published for the electorate’s consideration more than four months earlier (from June, 1979). More than 15 million Iranian voters willingly chose to subordinate themselves, their children and their country to an Islamic theocratic dictatorship, whose provisions were spelled out to them and accepted by them in an explicitly worded constitutional document that described the totalitarian system of Velayat-e Faqih (Rule of the Jurisprudent) and dedicated the nation to jihad.

Further, the preamble to the constitution made clear that the Iranian revolution was not intended to stop at the country’s borders but rather would strive for the formation of a “single world community” (ummah) in accordance with the “universal values of Islam,” thus committing Iran and its military forces to open-ended aggression and warfare (which followed soon enough).

While the draft Egyptian constitution contains no such institution as a Supreme Leader or Velayat-e Faqih, it does state in Article 2 that “Principles of Islamic Sharia are the principal source of legislation,” thus ensuring that genuine liberal democracy (in which the people and their representatives craft laws free of theological constraints) will have no chance in the new Egypt.

The Iranian people overwhelmingly supported Khomeini during the Iranian revolution in 1979.

The Iranian people overwhelmingly supported Khomeini during the Iranian revolution in 1979.

Also, as both Andrew McCarthy (here) and Barry Rubin (here) point out, the new constitution makes clear that implementation of sharia will be far stricter under the Muslim Brotherhood than it ever was under Mubarak: Article 219 defines the “principles of Islamic Sharia” to be bound by “sources accepted in Sunni doctrines and by the larger community,” which means the four classical schools of Sunni jurisprudence and the Islamic institution of scholarly consensus (ijma). The Hanafi, Hanbali, Maliki and Shafi’i schools hold that the principles of Islamic Law were fixed many centuries ago and have remained immutable ever since.

So, despite a cursory nod in the direction of individual “rights and freedoms” (Article 81), the very next words of the Egyptian draft document, stipulating that such rights and freedoms “shall be practiced in a manner not conflicting with the principles pertaining to State and society included in Part I of this Constitution,” make clear that means Egyptians get whatever “human rights” are allowed under sharia (see below).

Just like the 1990 Cairo Declaration of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, which exempted all Muslim countries from compliance with the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights and declared that under Islam, human rights means sharia and only sharia.

Further, much as Article 96 of the Iranian constitution designated the Guardian Council (comprised of 12 jurist experts in Islamic Law) to determine the “compatibility of the legislation passed by the Islamic Consultative Assembly with the laws of Islam,” so too does Egypt’s new constitution designate al-Azhar’s “Senior Scholars … to be consulted in matters pertaining to Islamic law.”
Thus, a non-elected assembly of Islamic jurists will be granted the authority to approve or disapprove any legislation the Egyptian parliament passes, with judgment to be based solely on Islamic laws set down in the 10th century.

Those laws assign the death penalty for adultery, apostasy from Islam, homosexuality and, in some cases, for blasphemy or slander (criticism) against Islam. They establish legal inequality between Muslims and non-Muslims and between men and women. And lest any think these laws apply only to Egyptians or only to Muslims, sharia also mandates jihad against non-believers for the express purpose of imposing sharia globally.

In addition, as Yousef al-Qaradawi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s senior jurist, decades of accumulated Brotherhood ideology, and the campaign speeches of Ikhwan stalwarts like Khairat al-Shater or Mohammed Morsi himself all attest, mainstream Islamic doctrine also mandates virulent hatred of infidels and Jews.

The Muslim Brotherhood may not move immediately to implement all of these principles, but approval of the new constitution would give them the authority and the popular mandate to do so. Morsi himself has left no doubt about how he intends to govern, pledging to an enthusiastic crowd in a May 2012 campaign speech on Egyptian TV that he is dedicated to “The shari’a, then the shari’a, and finally, the shari’a.”

And the thing is, the Egyptian people, who are over 70% literate, know all this either from their own reading or through their imams and mosques. Andrew Bostom has been indefatigable in drawing our attention to credible surveys of the Egyptian public which unambiguously and overwhelmingly demonstrate that they want “strict application of Sharia law in every Islamic country (74%),” to “keep Western values out of Islamic countries (91%)” and to “unify all Islamic countries into a single Islamic state or Caliphate (67%).”

As recently as December 2010, a Pew survey found that 82% of Egyptians favor the stoning to death of people who commit adultery, 77% approved of whipping and hand amputation for theft and 84% said they thought apostates from Islam should be executed.

Despite the last spasms of protest from Egypt’s tragically outnumbered liberals and secularists, does anyone still have any serious doubts about how this referendum is going to go? Backed and emboldened by the Obama administration in Washington, D.C., the Muslim Brotherhood has orchestrated its takeover of Egypt masterfully from the beginning: It won the initial constitutional amendments referendum by a landslide, then, together with its Salafist allies, grabbed an overwhelming majority in the January 2012 parliamentary elections, before taking the presidency in June 2012.

As Andrew McCarthy has pointed out, though, “The constitution was always the prize” and now that looks to be soon within their grasp as well. Once the December 15 up or down vote enshrines these sharia principles as law of the land, just as in Iran, there will be no going back for Egypt for a long, long time.

Clare Lopez is a senior fellow at RadicalIslam.org and a strategic policy and intelligence expert with a focus on the Middle East, national defense and counterterrorism. Lopez served for 20 years as an operations officer with the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

Egyptians:BOYCOTT Egypt’s December 15 Constitution Referendum

a_mural_of_Egypts_President_Mohamed_Mursi_on_the_wall_of_the_presidential_palace_in_Cairo_ReutersA mural of Egypts President Mohamed Mursi on the wall of the presidential palace in Cairo Reuters

 

Voice of the Copts:

Call to all Egyptians:

BOYCOTT
Egypt’s December 15 Constitution Referendum
and
Call to the International Community:
CONDEMN
Egypt’s new regime
Voice of the Copts appeals to all Egyptian freedom fighters fearlessly and heroically standing up against the Morsi regime: 
We support you as you continue to stand up and exercise enormous courage once again as when recently you opposed the dictatorial constitutional amendment of November 22 made by Mr. Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood party. Your bold action obligated Mr. Morsi to withdraw the power grab he executed in defiance of democratic principles. Now he has backed down and responded to your demands thanks to your brave persistence
All Egyptians must now likewise oppose Mr. Morsi’s new constitution draft by boycotting the December 15 referendum. The new draft promotes anti-democratic Islamic principles of intolerance. With a boycott, Egyptians can avoid another corrupt election and reject the avenue paved by Mr. Morsi toward Islamic Shariah law.
A select group chosen from the Muslim Brotherhood membership seeking Islamic supremacy has written Egypt’s new draft constitution with the future goal of creating an Islamic Umma. Expunge this draft now!
Voice of the Copts appeals to the international community:
Voice of the Copts appeals to leaders of the free world and human rights activists to stand with Egyptian freedom fighters and against any attempt by the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood to build a center of Islamic power and jihadist terrorism.
We demand that world leaders withdraw their recognition of Egypt’s phony “pro-democracy” leader, Mr. Morsi, who is backed by the illegal Muslim Brotherhood party. Freeze your political relationships with Egypt, halt all investments and aid to Egypt and force Mr. Morsi’s regime to step down. This will facilitate legitimate democratic goals yet to be achieved by Egypt’s freedom fighters.
Dr. Ashraf Ramelah
Founder and President
Voice of the Copts Coop.

Protesters in Egyptian industrial capital eject city boss, announce independence

Egyptian protesters demonstrate in the Nile Delta textile town of Mahalla el-Kubra (Reuters/ Stringer Egypt)

Egyptian protesters demonstrate in the Nile Delta textile town of Mahalla el-Kubra (Reuters/ Stringer Egypt)

RT:

Anti-government protesters in Mahalla, Egypt’s largest industrial city, have reportedly taken over the local city council and announced their autonomy from the state ruled by the Muslim Brotherhood.

­Protesters threw the head of their city council out of the building, announcing they “no longer belong to the Ikhwani state,” the Daily News Egypt reports.

Workers have attempted to create a “revolutionary council” and rule the industrial city, report suggests. The head of the Mahalla City Council, Ismail Fathy, however, denied the claims.

“The demonstrations, which attracted around 3,000 people, were peaceful,” he told satellite TV channel CBC in a phone interview. “Nothing of this sort happened.”

Mokhtar El-Ashri, the senior leader of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Freedom and Justice Party, also denied reports of Mahalla’s announcement to secede.

“I was in Mahalla all day, I did not see any of this happening,” he told CBC.

El-Mahalla el-Kubra, a city north of Cairo home to 450,000, was dubbed the cradle of the Egyptian revolution. The opposition April 6 movement was formed there in 2009, and the first major anti-government protests also took place there.

Meanwhile, unconfirmed reports circulating on Twitter suggest that protesters in four more Egyptian cities – Alexandria, Kafr Sheikh, Sharqaya and Sohag – have declared independence, announcing that President Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood have lost the legitimacy to rule following the deadly clashes in Cairo that left at least seven people killed and hundreds injured.

The Egypt Independent confirmed clashes between opponents and supporters of President Morsi in Alexandria on Friday evening, adding that demonstrators had broken into the city’s local council building.

Meanwhile in Tanta, Egypt’s fifth-largest city, a crowd of anti-government protesters reportedly torched the Freedom and Justice Party’s local headquarters.

Tens of thousands of anti-Mohamed Morsi protesters gather in front of the presidential palace on December 7, 2012 in Cairo (AFP Photo / Patrick Baz)

Tens of thousands of anti-Mohamed Morsi protesters gather in front of the presidential palace on December 7, 2012 in Cairo (AFP Photo / Patrick Baz)

Hoda Osman, president of the Arab and Middle Eastern Journalist  Association, believes that as public discontent in the streets grows,  President Morsi is repeating his predecessor’s mistakes.

“There  are lots of feelings against the Muslim Brotherhood by a lot of  Egyptians, especially because of the role they played right after the  revolution,” she explained. “A lot of people saw that they were  close to the army and the army was responsible for a lot of the problems  that we were seeing.”

Egyptians are seeing another dictator in the making – “they are seeing another Mubarak,” Osman said.

Read more with photots at RT

Walid Phares posted this on his facebook page:

demonstrators painted a slogan on the ground: "Morsi step down"

demonstrators painted a slogan on the ground: “Morsi step down”

Egypt rises up against Islamism and the Muslim Brotherhood.


Egypt rises up against Islamism and the Muslim Brotherhood.

A picture to be sent to the White House, the State Department, the Washington Think Tanks and the Ivy League Middle East Studies programs: Millions in Cairo are demonstrating against the Islamist regime in Egypt. Bloggers, Facebook citizens…
and free media must post this picture as evidence that the people of Egypt are rejecting the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafists. The US Congress must suspend Financial Aid to the Egyptian regime until Morsi resigns.
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