CAIR Leader Calling for Israel’s Destruction Leaves Organization

 

Cyrus McGoldrick

Cyrus McGoldrick

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By Joe Kaufman

Cyrus McGoldrick, the head of the New York chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR-NY), has announced his departure from the organization. This comes just weeks after McGoldrick was exposed for mimicking a slogan from Hamas calling for Israel’s destruction.

On his Facebook page, on Monday, January 7, McGoldrick stated, “It is with a heavy heart but also some excitement that I announce my departure from CAIR-New York.” He did not say why he was leaving CAIR, though he did ask those reading of his departure to “forgive me my shortcomings.” It was these shortcomings that might have pushed him out of the group.

On November 29, 2012, McGoldrick tweeted and posted to his Facebook page, “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.” Palestinian militants, including Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ), have been using this slogan for years. The river represents the Jordan River, and the sea is the Mediterranean – both sides of Israel. It denotes an end to Israel’s existence.

When it comes to making outrageous statements, McGoldrick has gained himself an unflattering reputation. In November, when Israel retaliated against Hamas, who had just fired hundreds of rockets into Israeli civilian neighborhoods, he chose to side with Hamas. He stated, “Gaza under attack for the last few days. May G-d protect them [Hamas] and grant them victory.

McGoldrick has publicly come out in support of a number of convicted terrorists and terrorist associates. They include:

  • Aafia Siddiqui, who had been sentenced to 86 years in prison for shooting at and attempting to kill American soldiers and FBI agents in Afghanistan
  • Tarek Mehanna, who received a 17.5 year sentence for plotting to kill Americans and providing material support to al-Qaeda
  • Lynne Stewart, who had been sentenced to ten years in prison for smuggling messages from imprisoned “Blind Sheikh” Omar Abdel Rahman, the spiritual leader of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing, to his violent followers in Egypt

Of them McGoldrick stated, “Until they are free, none of us are free.” That statement was made this month. And about Siddiqui, Mehenna and the Holy Land Foundation (HLF), an American Islamic charity that was shut down in December 2001 for raising millions of dollars for Hamas, he emphatically stated, “We have to fight for them.”

McGoldrick also took up the cause for Khader Adnan, a spokesman and senior West Bank leader of Palestinian Islamic Jihad (PIJ). Adnan had been jailed by the Israelis and was in the midst of a hunger strike, a tactic he had previously used when he had been imprisoned by the Palestinian Authority (PA).

McGoldrick wrote, “We must all be Khader Adnan. I don’t believe in hunger strikes, but our brother is struggling with the only thing he has left: his life.” No mention was made of the scores of innocent people, including Americans, who had brutally lost their lives at the hands of Adnan’s PIJ.

CAIR, like McGoldrick, has had problems relating to terrorism. A number of the group’s officials have been convicted in and/or deported from the United States for terrorist-associated crimes. Indeed, CAIR can credit its very existence to leaders of Hamas and PIJ. CAIR was established as a part of the American Palestine Committee, an umbrella organization created by then-global head of Hamas, Mousa Abu Marzook. And CAIR’s parent organization, the Islamic Association for Palestine (IAP) – also part of Marzook’s umbrella – was co-founded by PIJ leader Sami al-Arian.

But while CAIR is no stranger to terror, representatives from the organization, many times, have been careful about voicing support for those convicted of terrorist acts. McGoldrick, on the other hand, is overt and outspoken in his support. He is someone who brings a lot of unwanted attention to CAIR, attention that CAIR doesn’t crave, especially after the group was named a party to Hamas financing not too long ago, especially when CAIR is attempting to paint itself as a civil rights group, especially now as it is trying to worm its way into government circles.

McGoldrick’s words have already gotten him in trouble. When he recently tweeted a wild accusation regarding investigative journalist and counter-terrorism expert Steve Emerson, saying that Emerson had been involved in “child pornography,” Emerson sued for defamation.

It is these things and more – “shortcomings” – that would cause a group such as CAIR to disassociate itself with Cyrus McGoldrick. He is the true face of CAIR but probably a face CAIR would wish to be hidden – at least, for now.

Joe Kaufman is a candidate for United States Congress. He is an expert in the fields of counter-terrorism, foreign affairs and energy independence for America.

CAIR Rep: Violence Shows It’s America That Needs to Change

IPT News:

Anti-American violence throughout the Muslim world, ostensibly over a cheap Internet film denigrating the Muslim prophet Muhammad, may be misguided, but it’s a result of “the lack of dignity, the lack of respect that they’re being shown.” And it’s up to America to change policies to calm things.

That’s the message a Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) official brought to a television interview Sunday.

And that’s not the worst thing about Cyrus McGoldrick‘s comments.

McGoldrick’s interview was on Press TV, an Iranian government-controlled English-language news outlet. He never condemned the violence outright, saying “We’re very sensitive to the loss of life” and “people’s lives are always to be mourned.” The angry mobs show “no real understanding of nuance” because the American government neither financed the film nor had anything to do with its distribution.

Few protestors likely even saw the video, said McGoldrick, civil rights director for CAIR’s New York chapter. “And I don’t think it’s about the film at all, really, I think that people are tired. People have had enough of what is seen by them, what looks to them like America’s war on Islam. And this is one of the symptoms of that.”

That “war on Islam” narrative is acknowledged to be among the most effective messages in radicalizing Muslims. Even the White House acknowledges this. In the past week, a federal judge sentenced a 29-year-old to 30 years in prison after he plotted to detonate a suicide bomb inside the United States Capitol and arrested an 18-year-old in Chicago who thought he was detonating a car bomb outside a bar.

Both Amine El-Khalifi and Adel Daoud thought America was waging war on Islam.

McGoldrick could have told his Iranian network interviewer that such a perception is not only wrong, but dangerous. He could have pointed out that Muslims in America, especially Shia, are freer to practice their faith than in most Sunni Muslim nations.

But he didn’t. Instead, he raised doubt over the most fundamental American freedom.

Americans enjoy “allegedly a freedom of speech, a freedom of expression –political expression and religious expression,” he explained. “And of course, that comes with it some rights, but also, of course, some responsibilities.”

The recent violence, including the attack on the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya which killed Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans, might have be seen as “the straw that broke the camel’s back in terms of Muslims’ patience with American and Western intervention,” McGoldrick said.

That puts the onus on the United States “to very critically think about how much more weight will we put on the Muslim world? How many more attacks? How many more drone strikes? How many more coups … until we realize that we need to take a principled stand, and a just stand, to make sure that we respect human rights, sovereignty and dignity all over the world.”

McGoldrick is among a number of CAIR officials who routinely appear on Press TV, usually to denigrate American politics or policy.

But McGoldrick’s affinity with the Iranian regime runs deeper. He promoted the August 17 “al-Quds Day” rally in New York, advertising and marketing virulent anti-Israel rhetoric at the Iranian-inspired event.

Quds Day is a creation of the Iranian Ayatollah Khomeini and a frequent vehicle for Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to call for Israel’s elimination and to publicly delegitimize the West. Its organizers have adapted resolutions that endorse Hamas, and dismiss Palestinian terrorism as simple “side issues.”

McGoldrick promoted the al-Quds New York rally through twitter posts and even the CAIR-NY website.

Read more at IPT