With lure of religious classes, Iran seeks to recruit Latin Americans

AP -  This1995 photo shows Moshen Rabbani, former cultural attache in the Iranian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

AP – This1995 photo shows Moshen Rabbani, former cultural attache in the Iranian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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The Mexican law student was surprised by how easy it was to get into Iran two years ago. By merely asking questions about Islam at a party, he managed to pique the interest of Iran’s top diplomat in Mexico. Months later, he had a plane ticket and a scholarship to a mysterious school in Iran as a guest of the Islamic Republic.

Next came the start of classes and a second surprise: There were dozens of others just like him.

(Alejandro Pagni/ASSOCIATED PRESS) - Firefighters and rescue workers search through the rubble of the Buenos Aires Jewish Community center, after a car bomb rocked the building, killing 85 people, on July 18, 1994. Mohsen Rabbani, who currently runs several programs in Iran for Latin American students, was accused of the bombing.

(Alejandro Pagni/ASSOCIATED PRESS) – Firefighters and rescue workers search through the rubble of the Buenos Aires Jewish Community center, after a car bomb rocked the building, killing 85 people, on July 18, 1994. Mohsen Rabbani, who currently runs several programs in Iran for Latin American students, was accused of the bombing.

“There were 25 or 30 of us in my class, all from Latin America,” recalled the student, who was just 19 when he arrived at the small institute that styled itself an Iranian madrassa for Hispanics. “I met Colombians, Venezuelans, multiple Argentines.” Many were new Muslim converts, he said, and all were subject to an immersion course, in perfect Spanish, in what he described as “anti-Americanism and Islam.”

The student, whose first name is Carlos but who spoke on the condition that his full name not be used, left for home only three months later. But his brief Iranian adventure provides a window into an unusual outreach program by Iran, one that targets young adults from countries south of the U.S. border. In recent years, the program has brought hundreds of Latin Americans to Iran for intensive Spanish-language instruction in Iranian religion and culture, much of it supervised by a man who is wanted internationally on terrorism charges, according to U.S. officials and experts.

They describe the program as part of a larger effort by Iran to expand its influence in the Western Hemisphere by building a network of supporters and allies in America’s backyard. The initiative includes not only the recruitment of foreign students for special study inside Iran, but also direct outreach to Latin countries through the construction of mosques and cultural centers and, beginning last year, a new cable TV network that broadcasts Iranian programming in Spanish.

Regional experts say such “soft power” initiatives are mainly political, intended in particular to strengthen Tehran’s foothold in countries such as Venezuela and Ecuador, which share similar anti-American views. But in some cases, Iranian officials have sought to enlist Latin Americans for espionage and even hacking operations targeting U.S. computer systems, according to U.S. and Latin American law-enforcement and intelligence officials.

report issued in May by an Argentine prosecutor cited evidence of “local clandestine intelligence networks” organized by Iran in several South American countries. The document accused Tehran of using religious and cultural programs as cover to create a “capability to provide logistic, economic and operative support to terrorist attacks decided by the Islamic regime.”

Singled out in the report is an Iranian cleric and government official, Mohsen Rabbani, who runs several programs in Iran for Latin American students, including the one attended by Carlos. A former cultural attache in Buenos Aires, Rabbani was accused by Argentina of aiding the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center in that city that killed 85 people, the country’s deadliest terrorist attack.

Read more at Washington Post

2 thoughts on “With lure of religious classes, Iran seeks to recruit Latin Americans

  1. Pingback: Iranian Embassies Recruit Latin American Students | Shadow Diplomacy

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