Top Iranian General: Give Us Full Nuclear Rights or Deal Void

Jafari

Maj. Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari, the Guard’s chief commander, also said Israel would be destroyed if U.S. attacks Iran’s nuclear facilities.

BY REZA KAHLILI:

The leader of Iran’s Revolutionary Guard is warning not only the West, but his own government that any agreement reached in Geneva must guarantee the Islamic Republic’s full nuclear rights or it will be voided.

Maj. Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari, the Guard’s chief commander, also threatened to destroy Israel should Washington order an attack on Iran’s nuclear facilities.

“In case [Iranian] officials witness any violation or an effort to disregard our country’s inalienable nuclear rights by the West and America taking advantage of the [Geneva] agreement with their interpretation of it, they should consider the agreement annulled with full authority,” Jafari said in an exclusive interview Monday with Tasnim, an Iranian media outlet.

The Revolutionary Guard was organized early after the 1979 revolution as a parallel force to Iran’s military to protect the new regime and the clerical establishment. It is now the de facto force of the regime, its influence expanding to all aspects of the economy and the government.

Jafari said Islamic Republic principles require it to confront “oppressive powers,” and the country will continue to do so for as long as America continues its “arrogant behavior” against Iran and the rest of the world.

In blunt language, Jafari sneered at the use of the “military option” against Iran.

Read more at Clarion Project

 

Allies, Adversaries and the Right to Self-Defense

negotiatingby Ali Salim:

Critics of those who defend the free world from its adversaries accuse governments and security forces of wiretapping public figures, including friendly governments, and of conducting drone-executed targeted killings as an accepted form of warfare.

But is anyone looking at who, exactly, is criticizing the Western world’s actions that defend it against terrorism? Do they really believe that terrorism can be successfully fought without violence? Criticism, even if justified, can sabotage a just battle and people’s right to self-defense.

According to the Arabic proverb, “If you honor and respect a noble man, he will become your friend, but if you honor and respect a villain, he will rise up against you.”

One view of diplomacy, deemed misguided by leaders such as Churchill, is to abandon one’s friends and court one’s enemies in the assumption that the friend is yours and will not abandon you. The United States deserted the Shah for the Ayatollah’s Revolutionary Guards; it abandoned Mubarak for the Muslim Brotherhood Islamist Mohamed Morsi, and it has abandoned Iraq and Afghanistan to domestic chaos, growing terrorism and the approaching Islamist takeover.

Now, voices from the West and the Middle East have suggested that the status of the United States may be in jeopardy in countries where it previously had influence, such as Egypt.

The U.S. is withholding funding from the new Sisi regime, which may be the only chance of keeping Egypt from slipping back into the religious autocracy of the Muslim Brotherhood. America explained that its decision to cut funding to Egypt was due to lack of democratic process in Sisi’s advancement to power. Ironically, however, America has weakened the defenses of the world against violent Islamism, which can be defined as a militant political version of Islam, that outspokenly desires to take over the Arab-Muslim countries and turn them into a united base from which to bring Islam to the rest of the world. This goal, according to the Islamists, can be accomplished through irhab, or terrorism, with the eventual aim of converting everyone to Islam, using force if necessary. As it is written in the Noble Qur’an, Al-Anfal 8:60, “Against them make ready your strength to the utmost of your power, including steeds of war to strike fear into (the hearts of) the enemies of Allah, and your enemies…” Neutralizing the fight against Islamism in the name of democracy and pluralism sounds like justifying theft and drug dealing in the name of freedom to earn a living.

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In the war on terrorism the West cannot afford to flip-flop or apologize. Terrorism needs to be struck hard and all the relative advantages need to be used — wiretapping, drones, targeted killings and sanctions — against both terrorist groups and countries that sponsor terrorism, such as Iran.

Read more at Gatestone Institute

LYONS: The Iranian origins of treachery

10222013_b3-lyons-ap8201_s640x445By James A. Lyons Jr.

With all the media focus on the recently concluded talks in Geneva with Iran over its nuclear program, it’s easy to overlook the 30th anniversary of the U.S. Marine barracks bombing in Beirut 30 years ago on Oct. 23, 1983.

On that day, 241 of our finest military personnel were killed, with scores more seriously injured. Almost simultaneously, a similar attack was carried out at the French military headquarters, killing 58 French paratroopers. We have positive proof that these attacks were planned and ordered by Iran using their Islamic Amal terrorist proxies — forerunners to Hezbollah — in Lebanon. It is astounding that we had the information to prevent these attacks, and even more astounding is the “reason” for not retaliating.

The National Security Agency issued a highly classified message dated Sept. 27, 1983, which contained the instructions that Iranian Ambassador Ali Akbar Montashemi in Damascus had previously received from Tehran and then gave to Husayn al-Musawi, the leader of the Islamic Amal. Those instructions directed the terrorist group to concentrate its attacks on the Multi-National Force but take a “spectacular” action against the U.S. Marines.

I was deputy chief of naval operations at that time, and I did not receive that message until Oct. 25, two days after the bombing. That same day, I was called out to the CIA’s Langley headquarters because CIA Director William Casey wanted to see me. At the meeting, Casey asked me whether I would develop plans to take out the perpetrators if he discovered who they were and where they were located. I readily agreed.

The terrorist group, Islamic Amal, was located in the Lebanese Army Sheik Abdallah barracks near Baalbek, Lebanon. The organization had taken over the barracks on Sept. 16 with the help of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps. I had the strike plans couriered to the 6th Fleet Carrier Strike Force for the commander, Rear Adm. Jerry Tuttle, because I knew then the Soviets were reading our communications.

Everyone had been briefed, including the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger. According to National Security Adviser Robert McFarland, at the key meeting with President ReaganWeinberger stated that he thought there were Lebanese Army groups in the barracks. This was false.

The president turned to Casey for clarification. Casey, who had just returned from an overseas trip, was not up to speed on such details. The president then said, “Get that sorted out.” As it turned out, there were no Lebanese Army troops in the barracks. But Weinberger threw more dust into the air by stating that we will lose all of our Arab friends if we go ahead with this strike.

Consequently, we never received the execute order, even though the planes were loaded and ready to launch. In the words of the Carrier Strike Force commander, “This was a chip shot.” The failure to retaliate was tragic, and we are still living with that mistake.

Compounding the problem, Reagan approved a combined strike with the French against the same target several days later. This time, the secretary of defense simply ignored the president’s order and would not issue the strike order. Mr. McFarland and Secretary of State George Shultz both told me that they tried to get Weinberger to change his position but failed. The French were furious. They carried out the strike alone, but did no damage, contrary to Reagan’s diary entry that stated the French wiped out the terrorists.

Read more at Washington Times

America and the good psychopaths

Basij boys-thumb-470x352-3138

By Caroline Glick:

In his speech on Tuesday before the UN General Assembly, Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu tried to get the Americans to stop their collective swooning at the sight of an Iranian president who smiled in their general direction.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” the premier warned, “I wish I could believe [President Hassan] Rouhani, but I don’t because facts are stubborn things. And the facts are that Iran’s savage record flatly contradicts Rouhani’s soothing rhetoric.”

He might have saved his breath. The Americans weren’t interested.

Two days after Netanyahu’s speech, US Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel issued a rejoinder to Netanyahu. “I have never believed that foreign policy is a zero-sum game,” Hagel said.

Well, maybe he hasn’t. But the Iranians have.

And they still do view diplomacy – as all their dealings with their sworn enemies – as a zerosum game.

As a curtain raiser for Rouhani’s visit, veteran New York Times war correspondent Dexter Filkins wrote a long profile of Iran’s real strongman for The New Yorker. Qassem Suleimani is the head of the Revolutionary Guard Corps. It is the most powerful organ of the Iranian regime, and Suleimani is Iranian dictator Ayatollah Ali Khamenei’s closest confidante and adviser.

Rouhani doesn’t hold a candle to Suleimani.

Filkin’s profile is detailed, but deeply deceptive.

The clear sense he wishes to impart on his readers is that Suleimani is a storied war veteran and a pragmatist. He is an Iranian patriot who cares about his soldiers. He’s been willing to cut deals with the Americans in the past when he believed it served Iran’s interests. And given Suleimani’s record, it is reasonable to assume that Rouhani – who is far more moderate than he – is in a position to make a deal and will make one.

The problem with Filkin’s portrayal of Suleimani as a pragmatist, and a commander who cares about the lives of his soldiers – and so, presumably cares about the lives of Iranians – is that it is belied by the stories Filkins reported in the article.

Filkins describes at length how Suleimani came of age as a Revolutionary Guard division commander during the Iran-Iraq War from 1980 to 1988, and how that war made him the complicated, but ultimately reasonable, (indeed parts of the profile are downright endearing), pragmatist he is today.

As the commander of the Revolutionary Guards, Suleimani commands the Syrian military and the foreign forces from Iran, Hezbollah and Iraq that have been deployed to Syria to keep Basher Assad in power.

Filkins quotes an Iraqi politician who claimed that in a conversation with Suleimani last year that the Iranian called the Syrian military “worthless.”

He then went on to say, “Give me one brigade of the Basij, and I could conquer the whole country.”

Filkins notes that it was the Basij that crushed the anti-Islamist Green Revolution in Iran in 2009. But for a man whose formative experience was serving as a Revolutionary Guards commander in the Iran-Iraq War, Suleimani’s view of the Basij as a war-fighting unit owes to what it did in its glory days, in that war, not on the streets of Tehran in 2009.

As Matthias Kuntzel reported in 2006, the Revolutionary Guards formed the Basij during the Iran-Iraq War to serve as cannon fodder. Basij units were made up of boys as young as 12.

They were given light doses of military training and heavy doses of indoctrination in which they were brainwashed to reject life and martyr themselves for the revolution.

As these children were being recruited from Iran’s poorest villages, Ayatollah Khomeini purchased a half million small plastic keys from Taiwan.

They were given to the boys before they were sent to battle and told that they were the keys to paradise. The children were then sent into minefields to die and deployed as human waves in frontal assaults against superior Iraqi forces.

By the end of the war some 100,000 of these young boys became the child sacrifices of the regime.

Read more at Jeruslaem Post

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Israeli Security Service Arrests Iranian Spy

Ali Mansouri, an alleged Iranian spy / AP

Ali Mansouri, an alleged Iranian spy / AP

BY: :

JERUSALEM – Israel’s Shin Bet security service yesterday announced the detention in Tel Aviv of an Iranian-born businessman with Belgian citizenship suspected of spying for Teheran.

The suspect, named as Ali Mansouri, was arrested on September 11 at Ben-Gurion Airport as he was preparing to board a flight for Belgium. His detention was announced as Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was making his way to New York where he is to address the UN.

Netanyahu is expected to refocus world attention on the Iranian nuclear issue after Iran’s new president, Hassan Rowhani, attempted to defuse the subject. Israeli columnists saw the timing of the announcement of Mansouri’s detention as an attempt to provide Netanyahu with rhetorical ammunition.

Israeli officials said Mansouri was spying on American interests in Israel. He was reportedly seen photographing the U.S. embassy in Tel Aviv and “recording activity there.” Officials said that he admitted to being promised $1 million for his activities in Israel by the special operations unit of the Iranian Revolutionary Guards.

“At a time when Iran is trying to get closer to the U.S. it sent an agent to try to gather intelligence in order to carry out a terror attack against the American embassy in Israel. This is one further example of Iran’s policy of doublespeak and further proof that Iran’s words do not match its actions,” a member of the prime minister’s delegation to New York told the Times of Israel.

Read more at Free Beacon

 

Video: Iran’s Rouhani Brags – Nuclear Progress Via Deception

RouhaniBY RYAN MAURO:

The “moderate” image crafted by Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, parroted by the mainstream media, is exposed as a deceptive mirage in a new video released by Reza Kahlili, a former CIA spy who worked inside the Iranian Revolutionary Guards (watch video below). Rouhani is seen with a big smile as he discusses Iran’s nuclear program’s advances under his watch through the use of deception and the pitting of Europe against America.

Rouhani exudes pride as he describes his successful tenure as Iran’s chief nuclear negotiator on behalf of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Khamenei. He also reiterates that he represents Khamenei in the Supreme National Security Council, essentially making them two sides of the same coin.

The video opens with Rouhani explaining that he is responsible for huge advances in Iran’s nuclear program:

“The day we invited the three European ministers, only 10 centrifuges were spinning at Natanz. We could not produce one gram of U4 or U6 [uranium hexafluoride]. We did not have the heavy water, we could not produce yellowcake, our total production of centrifuges inside the country was 150. We wanted to complete all of these, we needed time.” [emphasis mine]

One of the tactics he used was deception. He refers to Iran’s 2003 declaration that states:

“[W]hile Iran has a right within the nuclear non-proliferation regime to develop nuclear energy for peaceful purposes it has decided voluntarily to suspend all uranium enrichment and processing activities as defined by the IAEA.”

Referring to the declaration, Rouhani says, “The statement of Tehran in that declaration, there was a resolution that all [uranium enrichment and processing] must stop but we did not allow it.”

With a gleaming smile, Rouhani boasts of finishing the construction of the Bushehr nuclear reactor and the Arak heavy water plant and increasing the number of centrifuges from 150 to 1,700 at Natanz.

Rouhani explains how he put Europe and America on opposite sides and took advantage of the friendliness of Mohammed El-Baradei, who was then serving as the chief of the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency. El-Baradei is now Egypt’s Vice President for Foreign Affairs.

Read more at The Clarion Project

 

 

Iran’s Terror Cells in Syria Exposed

iran mapBY RYAN MAURO:

The National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI), an Iranian opposition group that has previously exposed top-secret Iranian nuclear sites, has provided the Clarion Project with precise details of Iran’s operations to assist Syrian dictator Bashar Assad. The information includes a photo of an alleged base in Iran where training is taking place.

MEK (the Mujahideen-e-Khalq resistance group, which is part of the NCRI ) says that the following data was gathered from dozens of sources inside the Iranian regime and accumulated by the MEK. This includes informants inside the Revolutionary Guards, Defense Ministry and the Joint Chiefs of Staff of the Armed Forces.

The training of operatives to fight in Syria is taking place northeast of Tehran at a Revolutionary Guards base called Saheb al-Zaman, also known as the 27th Shaheed Pazouki Base. The base is located in the southeast part of Sorkheh Hesar Park.

The NCRI tells the Clarion Project that the majority of trainees at the above base are Iraqis, specifically those belonging to Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq and Kataeb-Hezbollah. Approximately 90% of Asa’ib’s fighters have been sent to Syria since March. Iran is also recruiting fighters from Yemen, where it has a relationship with the Houthi rebels.

The intelligence details how the operation is run. The Iraqi Shiiteterrorists are dispatched by a man named “Yousef” who oversees the group’s training. He speaks to each fighter sent to Syria and gives them $1,300 each to help take care of their families. The recruits are sent to an Asai’b Ahl-Haq base in Basra and then to the Shalamceh border region. The next destination is Ahvaz in Khuzestan Province.

Once in Iran, the terrorists are separated into groups of between 60 and 80 operatives and sent to Qom for pilgrimage. Abu Fatema, a former commander of the Iraqi “Special Groups” that fought U.S. forces runs a base in Qom that is visited by the recruits. The Iraqis then visit the grave of Ayatollah Khomeini and then training begins. The recruits are provided with military attire and arms.

Read more at The Clarion Project