Why Trump should endorse allies’ demands upon terror-cozy Qatar

XtockImages | Getty Images

Conservative Review, by Jordan Schachtel, June 23, 2017:

The United States should wholeheartedly support Arab states’ attempts to rein in the renegade state of Qatar, as Gulf leaders attempt to cut down on Doha’s out of control terror promoting and jihadi financing policies.

On Thursday, Middle Eastern countries issued a list of 13 demands that need to be met in order to restore relations with Qatar. They have given Qatar 10 days to comply with the ultimatums. The list of demands aligns so well with American nationalist interests that it wouldn’t come as a shock if American officials had a role in drafting the document.

Among the most “America-first” of the 13 mandates include:

1) Dramatically scale down ties with the Iranian regime and expel members of its Islamic Revolutionary Guards (IRGC) from the country.

Iran has long been accused of sowing discord in the Middle East and fanning the flames of war. The regime in Tehran, which considers the United States “The Great Satan,” directly supports terrorist organizations such as Hamas and Hezbollah, and has aided attempts to overthrow governments in Yemen, Bahrain, Kuwait, and elsewhere. The IRGC, which is tasked with exporting Iran’s revolutionary ideology through military force, is heavily involved in the Syrian Civil War, supporting the Assad regime and Russia in committing sectarian war crimes against innocents.

2) Shut down the Turkish military base that is currently under construction in Qatar.

Though a NATO ally, Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s Turkey continues to trend towards Islamic authoritarianism. In May, bodyguards for the Turkish strongman viciously attacked American citizens protesting outside of the Turkish ambassador’s home in Washington, D.C. Additionally, Turkey supports and aids the global jihadist Muslim Brotherhood network, and U.S.-designated terrorist organizations like Hamas.

3) Eliminate ties for terrorist organizations such as the Muslim Brotherhood, Hezbollah, Al Qaeda, and Hamas.

Qatar continues to harbor Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, who has endorsed suicide operations against American soldiers. Additionally, there is overwhelming evidence that high-ranking members of the Qatari regime have aided and abetted Al Qaeda’s branch in Syria. Even as the U.S. has recently arrested Hezbollah agents charged with plotting terrorist attacks on American soil, the Emir in Doha considers Hezbollah a “legitimate resistance” movement. Though Qatar claims to be fighting ISIS, U.S. counterterror officials continue to claim that they’re a chief funding resource for the caliphatist[RH1] group.

6) Shut down Al Jazeera and its affiliates.

Al Jazeera is a state-run media agency in Doha that is masquerading as a free media enterprise. The outfit is currently facing a new lawsuit claiming it collaborated directly with the Muslim Brotherhood during Islamist revolts that resulted in the overthrow of the Egyptian government. In 2013, 22 staff members resigned to protest the network’s bias in favor of the Muslim Brotherhood. The news network’s Arabic channel has had a hand in radicalizing its viewership towards Islamist beliefs. A 2015, an Al Jazeera Arabic poll showed 81 percent of respondents supported the Islamic State terror group. Its short-lived American outlet acted as an Islamic blasphemy police, banning words like “terrorist,” “militant,” “Islamist,” and “jihad” from its reporting. After the 9/11 attacks, Al Jazeera headquarters in Doha was decorated with silhouettes glorifying Osama bin Laden.

Since the Arab states’ blockade against Qatar began, American officials have been all over the place on whether the United States supports or disputes the measures.

President Trump — who gave a speech in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia just prior to the embargo, urging Middle Eastern countries to do more to quash terrorist financing — appears to be supportive of the Arab initiative, labeling Qatar a “funder of terrorism at a very high level.” The president is also considering hosting a “Camp David-style” summit for Arab leaders to explore how to further crack down on Qatar’s terror finance and other terror supporting Middle East entities.

However, the Pentagon under Secretary James Mattis, and the State Department under Rex Tillerson, have acted instead to empower the Qatari monarchy.

The Pentagon recently signed a multi-billion dollar arms deal with Qatar, allowing for the sale of 36 U.S. F-16 fighter jets.

And this week, Tillerson’s State Department commanded Arab allies to rescind demands of Qatar, and immediately end the embargo. The State Department even called into question the overwhelming evidence that Qatar is a financier of international terrorism, and refused to name Qatar as a state-sponsor of terror.

It would be challenging to find a more pro-American document than the list of dictates being offered up by our Middle East allies. The White house has been presented with a historic opportunity to finally quash the rich oil-regime’s support for the world’s worst actors. Squandering that opportunity — when pressure on Qatar is as high as it will ever be — would result in the loss of a much-needed boost to American security interests and global stability.

Jordan Schachtel is the national security correspondent for Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @JordanSchachtel.

BREAKING: Gulf States Give Qatar List of Demands To Restore Diplomatic Relationships – All Demands Target The Muslim Brotherhood…

 The Last Refuge, by Sundance, June 22, 2017:

The latest development, in the ongoing Arab state GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) initiative to stem the destabilizing behavior of Qatar, is a list of demands presented to Qatar. If you have followed the regional issues for the past few years you’ll quickly identify how each of the demands cuts to the core of the destabilizing issues.

Included in the demands:  ♦Shut down al-Jazeera, ♦stop cooperating with Iran and ♦expel Turkish military provocateurs (Erdogan).  The binding thread that connects each of these demands is the effort to stop Qatar from supporting/assisting the Muslim Brotherhood.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kuwait has given Qatar a list of demands from Saudi Arabia and other Arab nations that includes shutting down Al-Jazeera and cutting diplomatic ties to Iran.

That’s according to a list obtained by The Associated Press from one of the countries involved in the dispute. The document says Qatar has 10 days to comply with all demands.

The list says Qatar must immediately close Turkey’s military base in Qatar and end military cooperation with the NATO member. It also demands an unspecified sum of compensation from Qatar.

Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain cut ties to Qatar this month over accusations the Persian Gulf country funds terrorism. The U.S. has been urging them to produce a list of demands. Kuwait is helping mediate. (link)

Additionally, a reputable and reliable source for news and information within the region, specifically well-connected to the MB issues, provides the following:

This list of demands could have been personally written by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi because it is exactly what he needed to do when he expelled the Muslim Brotherhood from Egypt and restored stability in the aftermath of Mohammed Morsi’s chaos.

U.S. President Donald Trump welcomes Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 3, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Rogue Rex? State Dept demands allies back off terror-linked Qatar

AP

Conservative Review, by Jordan Schachtel, June 21, 2017:

While President Trump appears more than willing to pressure Qatar into dropping its support for terrorist entities, the U.S. State Department has decided to attack American allies in the Middle East, demanding that they immediately cease their embargo against Qatar.

About two weeks ago, several Middle East states decided that they could no longer sit idly by while Qatar continued its cozy relationship with terrorist entities such as Al Qaeda, the Muslim Brotherhood, and the terrorist-sponsoring regime in Tehran. They imposed a massive embargo on Qatar and dismissed its diplomats from their nations.

The move came almost immediately following President Trump’s “Drive Them Out” speech in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in which he called upon the Islamic world to do more to hold accountable the nefarious actors inside and outside their nations.

And in a call with Saudi Arabia’s newly installed crown prince Wednesday, the president spoke of the situation in Qatar, prioritizing “cutting off all support for terrorists and extremists,” according to a White House readout of the conversation.

Through his social media accounts, Trump praised the embargo as a necessary reaction and pointed to Qatar’s terror financing.

But on Tuesday, Rex Tillerson’s State Department decided to condemn the embargo, seemingly directly contradicting the president’s stance.

“Now that it has been more than two weeks since the embargo has started, we are mystified that the gulf states have not released to the public nor to the Qataris the details about the claims they are making toward Qatar,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said in a slap to U.S. regional allies.

She continued: “The more time goes by, the more doubt is raised about the actions taken by Saudi Arabia and the U.A.E.”

Nauert then called into question the motives behind the embargo:

“At this point, we are left with one simple question: Were the actions really about their concerns regarding Qatar’s alleged support for terrorism, or were they about the long simmering grievances?”

There is hardly anything “alleged” about Qatar’s support for terror. Qatar has somewhat transparently supported Al Qaeda networks in Syria. World leaders have accused Qatar of funding ISIS. Its chief officials regularly host the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, Yusuf Al-Qaradawi, who has publicly called for suicide bombings against American soldiers. Qatar maintains a close relationship with the Iranian regime, which the United States considers the world’s foremost state sponsor of terrorism. Lastly, Qatar distributes militant Islamist, anti-U.S. propaganda on its state-run hate network, Al Jazeera.

So why is the State Department taking such a soft approach towards Qatar? The answer may be discovered in Rex Tillerson’s history as chief of ExxonMobil.

Secretary Tillerson, a former oil executive, has long been extremely close with the regime in Doha.

Over the past few years, Tillerson has met personally with Qatar’s leader several times. Less than a week after election day, Tillerson arrived in Doha to discuss ExxonMobil and Qatar. He and Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani met again in September 2016 on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly. They again got together during Tillerson’s February 2016 trip to Doha. They once more met in private in Houston in February 2015. And those are only the meetings between the two that were disclosed to the public.

As ExxonMobil CEO, he sang the praises of Qatar, even as the country supported terror and maintained its vicious human rights record.

“It is evident why Qatar is an example to the world,” Tillerson said at a 2009 energy conference in Qatar, adding, “We must learn from Qatar’s vision and its policies.” A year later, at another Qatar conference, Tillerson praised “Qatar’s visionary leadership” in the energy industry.

Conservative Review reached out to the State Department to try to get to the bottom of the contradiction between the comments coming from President Trump and from Secretary Tillerson.

CR asked whether the State Department considers Qatar to be a state supporter of terrorist organizations. A State Department official pointed to the U.S. State Department’s State Sponsors of Terrorism list, which does not include Qatar. CR also asked if State wanted Gulf allies to lift their embargo of Qatar immediately. The official referred CR to the transcript from Tuesday’s briefing, in which State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert attacks U.S. allies for imposing the embargo.

Is Rex Tillerson going rogue and defying the agenda of the president? Or has he instead been delegated authority by the president to conduct diplomatic affairs as he sees fit? Regardless of his motives or authority, Tillerson’s State Department is backing away from what could be a seminal moment for real, positive change in the Middle East.

Glick: Qatar, Trump and Double Games

Front Page Magazine, by Caroline Glick, June 9, 2017:

Originally published by the Jerusalem Post

US President Donald Trump has been attacked by his ubiquitous critics for his apparent about-face on the crisis surrounding Qatar.

In a Twitter post on Tuesday, Trump sided firmly with Saudi Arabia, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates and the other Sunni states that cut diplomatic ties with Qatar and instituted an air and land blockade of the sheikhdom on Monday.

On Wednesday, Trump said that he hopes to mediate the dispute, more or less parroting the lines adopted by the State Department and the Pentagon which his Twitter posts disputed the day before.

To understand the apparent turnaround and why it is both understandable and probably not an about-face, it is important to understand the forces at play and the stakes involved in the Sunni Arab world’s showdown with Doha.

Arguably, Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Islamic world has been second only to Iran’s.

Beginning in the 1995, after the Pars gas field was discovered and quickly rendered Qatar the wealthiest state in the world, the Qatari regime set about undermining the Sunni regimes of the Arab world by among other things, waging a propaganda war against them and against their US ally and by massively funding terrorism.

The Qatari regime established Al Jazeera in 1996.

Despite its frequent denials, the regime has kept tight control on Al Jazeera’s messaging. That messaging has been unchanging since the network’s founding. The pan-Arab satellite station which reaches hundreds of millions of households in the region and worldwide, opposes the US’s allies in the Sunni Arab world. It supports the Muslim Brotherhood and every terrorist group spawned by it. It supports Iran and Hezbollah.

Al Jazeera is viciously anti-Israel and anti-Jewish.

It serves as a propaganda arm not only of al-Qaida and Hezbollah but of Hamas, Islamic Jihad and any other group that attacks the US, Israel, Europe and other Western targets.

Al Jazeera’s reporters have accompanied Hamas and Taliban forces in their wars against Israel and the US. After Israel released Hezbollah arch-terrorist Samir Kuntar from prison in exchange for the bodies of two IDF reservists, Al Jazeera’s Beirut bureau hosted an on-air party in his honor.

Al Jazeera was at the forefront of the propaganda campaign inciting against then-Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak in 2011 and against Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi in 2012. Its operations were widely credited with inciting their overthrow and installing in their places regimes controlled by the Muslim Brotherhood and other jihadist groups.

As for the regime itself, it has massively financed jihadist groups for more than 20 years. Qatar is a major bankroller not only of al-Qaida and Hamas but of militias associated with ISIS in Iraq and Syria. In a State Department cable from 2009 published by WikiLeaks, US diplomats referred to Qatar as the largest funder of terrorism in the world.

According to the Financial Times, the straw that broke the camel’s back for the Saudis and their allies was their discovery that in April, Qatar paid Iran, its Iraqi militias and al-Qaida forces in Syria up to a billion dollars to free members of the royal family held captive in southern Iraq and 50 terrorists held captive in Syria.

Given Qatar’s destabilizing and pernicious role in the region and worldwide in everything related to terrorism funding and incitement, Trump’s statement on Tuesday in support of the Sunnis against Qatar was entirely reasonable. What can the US do other than stand by its allies as they seek to coerce Qatar to end its destabilizing and dangerous practices? The case for supporting the Saudis, Egyptians, the UAE and the others against Qatar becomes all the more overwhelming given their demands.

The Sunnis are demanding that Qatar ditch its strategic alliance with Iran. They demand that Qatar end its financial support for terrorist groups and they demand that Qatar expel terrorists from its territory.

If Qatar is forced to abide by these demands, its abandonment of Iran in particular will constitute the single largest blow the regime in Tehran has absorbed in recent memory. Among other things, Qatar serves as Iran’s banker and diplomatic proxy.

If the story began and ended here, then Trump’s anti-Qatari stance would have been the obvious and only move. Beyond being the right thing to do, if Qatar’s regime is overthrown or emasculated, the development would mark the most significant achievement to date against the Iranian axis of jihad.

Unfortunately, the situation is not at all simple.

First there is the problem of Doha’s relations with key Americans and American institutions.

Ahead of the 2016 US elections, WikiLeaks published documents which disclosed that the emir of Qatar presented Bill Clinton with a $1 million check for the Clinton Foundation as a gift for his 65th birthday. During Hillary Clinton’s tenure as secretary of state, Qatar reportedly contributed some $6m. to the Clinton Foundation.

Clinton, for her part, was deeply supportive of the regime and of Al Jazeera. For instance, in testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 2011, Clinton praised Al Jazeera for its leading role in fomenting and expanding the protests in Egypt that brought down Mubarak.

Clinton wasn’t the only one that Qatar singled out for generosity. Since the 1990s, Qatar has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in US universities. Six major US universities have campuses in Doha.

Then there is the Brookings Institution. The premier US think tank had a revolving door relationship with the Obama and Clinton administrations.

In 2014, The New York Times reported that Brookings, which opened a branch in Doha in 2002, had received millions of dollars in contributions from Qatar. In 2013 alone, the Qatari regime contributed $14.8 million to Brookings.

Not surprisingly, Brookings’ scholars supported the overthrow of Mubarak, and supported the Muslim Brotherhood regime during its year in power. Brookings scholars urged the Obama administration to cut off military assistance to Egypt after the military overthrew the Muslim Brotherhood in 2013.

Brookings scholars have similarly written sympathetically of Qatar and its ally Turkey. As the Investigative Project on Terrorism revealed in a four-part series on Brookings’ relations with Qatar in 2014, Brookings’ scholars ignored human rights abuses by Qatar and praised Turkey’s Erdogan regime as behaving like the US in enabling religion to have a role in public life.

It is likely that given then-president Barack Obama’s strategic goal of reorienting US Middle East policy away from its traditional Sunni allies and Israel toward Iran and its allies in Qatar and Turkey, that Brookings, Clinton and other beneficiaries of Qatar’s generosity were simply knocking on an open door. Indeed, in 2014, during Operation Protective Edge, the Obama administration’s alliance with Qatar, Turkey and Iran against Sunnis and Israel came out of the shadows.

During the Hamas war with Israel, Obama sought to dislodge Egypt from its traditional role as mediator between Israel and Hamas and replace it with Qatar and Turkey. For their part, both regimes, which fund and support Hamas, accepted all of Hamas’s cease-fire demands against Israel and Egypt. As their partner, the Obama administration also supported Hamas’s demands.

Had Egypt and Israel bowed to those demands, Hamas would have achieved a strategic victory in its war against Israel and Egypt. To avoid buckling to US pressure, Egypt built a coalition with the same states that are now leading the charge against Qatar – Saudi Arabia and the UAE – and openly supported Israel.

In the end, the standoff between the two sides caused the war to end in a draw. Hamas was not dismantled, but it failed to secure Israeli or Egyptian acceptance of any of its demands for open borders and access to the international banking system.

Given that Trump is not aligned with Brookings, the Clinton Foundation or US academia, it could be argued that he is not beholden to Qatari money in any way.

But unfortunately, they are not the only beneficiaries of Qatari largesse.

There is also the Pentagon.

In the 1990s, Qatar spent more than $1b. constructing the Al Udeid Air Base outside of Doha.

It is the most sophisticated air force base in the region. In 2003, the base replaced Saudi Arabia’s Prince Sultan Air Base as headquarters for the US military’s Central Command. Since 2003, all US operations in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria are controlled from the base.

Following Trump’s Twitter postings, the Pentagon was quick to say that operations at Al Udeid base had not been influenced by the crisis between Qatar and its neighbors. The Pentagon spokesman refused to say whether or not Qatar sponsors terrorism.

Instead, Capt. Chris Davis stated, “I consider them a host to our very important base at Al Udeid.” He commended Qatar for hosting US forces and for its “enduring commitment to regional security.”

Also on Tuesday, according to the Egyptian media, Iran deployed Revolutionary Guard Corps forces to Doha to protect the emir and his palace.

On Wednesday, Turkey’s parliament voted to empower Erdogan to deploy forces to Qatar to protect the regime.

The moves by Qatar’s allies Iran and Turkey significantly raise the stakes in the contest of wills now at play between Qatar and its Sunni neighbors and adversaries.

With Iranian forces guarding the palace and the emir, the possibility of a bloodless coup inside the Al Thani family has been significantly diminished.

Any move against the emir will raise the prospect of an open war with Iran.

So, too, if Egypt and Saudi Arabia invade or otherwise attack Qatar, with or without US support, the US risks seeing its Arab allies at war with its NATO ally Turkey.

Under the circumstances, Trump’s refusal to endorse Article 5 of the NATO treaty during his speech in Brussels appears wise and well-considered.

Article 5 states that an attack against one NATO ally represents an attack against all NATO allies.

With the Pentagon dependent on the Qatari base, and with no clear path for unseating the emir through war or coup without risking a much larger and more dangerous conflict, the only clear option is a negotiated resolution.

Under the circumstances, the best the US can probably work toward openly is a diminishment of Qatar’s regional profile and financial support for Iran and its terrorist allies and proxies. Hence, Trump’s announcement on Wednesday that he will mediate the conflict.

However, in the medium and long term, Trump’s statement on Twitter made clear his ultimate goal.

Caroline Glick is the Director of the David Horowitz Freedom Center’s Israel Security Project and the Senior Contributing Editor of The Jerusalem Post. For more information on Ms. Glick’s work, visit carolineglick.com

Isolating terror sponsor Qatar is right way to ‘Drive them out’

franckreporter | Getty Images

QATAR IS BELIEVED TO BE WORLD’S FOREMOST STATE BACKER OF ISIS.

Conservative Review, by Jordan Schachtel, June 5, 2017:

Just two weeks ago, President Donald Trump called upon the Muslim-majority nations of the world to quash the jihadist movements both inside and outside their countries’ borders.

“Drive. Them. Out!” the president told the Muslim world while making his first foreign trip to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. “Drive them out of your places of worship. Drive them out of your communities. Drive them out of your holy land, and drive them out of this Earth.”

Now, emboldened Gulf states appear to be responding to the president’s call for action.

Several Middle Eastern and African countries have decided to boycott and isolate the nation of Qatar. Saudi Arabia, which led the diplomatic severing of ties, said Qatar’s “embrace of various terrorist and sectarian groups aimed at destabilizing the region” forced their hand. So far, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Bahrain, the UAE, Maldives, Mauritius, and the internationally recognized government in Yemen have cut ties with Qatar.

There are two primary explanations to explain the diplomatic chaos.

First and foremost, Doha’s agenda ultimately threatens the stability of the Gulf states’ leadership structures.

Qatar continues to cozy up to the Iranian regime, and broadcasts Islamist propaganda on its state-run Al Jazeera network (which is immensely popular throughout the Middle East).

Both Iran and the global Muslim Brotherhood are involved in plots to try and overthrow the Gulf monarchies. The Gulf states prioritize threats to the governing structure over anything else. Therefore, the actions taken by these states should be understood as, above all else, mere measures of self-preservation.

Second, by breaking association with Qatar, Arab countries appear to be sending a message that they are responding to the American president’s call for action, and that supporting radical elements out in the open should not be tolerated.

Qatar has long been accused of providing direct support and aid to Islamic terrorist groups like ISIS and al-Qaida. Moreover, Doha is unapologetically supportive of the Muslim Brotherhood and its Palestinian branch in Hamas. Qatar has long been home to the top political official of Hamas and the spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, both of whom have endorsed terrorist attacks against innocents.

As part of a campaign to defend itself from criticism in the West, Qatar has invested millions of dollars in major American political campaigns, think tanks, universities, and other non-profits. The left-leaning Brookings Institution received around $15 million from Qatar (with Brookings employees being barred from criticizing Doha as part of a reported agreement). Additionally, while former presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was secretary of state, her Clinton Foundation received a $1 million donation from the government of Qatar.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, who maintains very close ties with the Qatari regime, has encouraged the diplomacy-severing countries to “sit down together and address these differences.” As CEO of ExxonMobil, Tillerson met countless times with top officials in Doha to strike mega-sum energy deals.

The Trump administration has not released an official statement on the matter, but Tillerson’s plea seems to contradict President Trump’s “drive them out” remarks in Riyadh.

Undoubtedly complicating the situation is the fact that Qatar hosts the largest U.S. air base in the Middle East. Some 11,000 U.S. personnel are stationed at Al Udeid Air Base, which serves as the de facto headquarters for the United States and coalition operations against the Islamic State.

Given that Qatar is a major sponsor of global jihad, the U.S. should support these nations’ efforts to rein in Qatar and end its support for extremist elements. The embargo of Qatar is only hours old, but has already garnered immense leverage against Doha. The results can serve as a major boost to U.S. security and global stability.

Jordan Schachtel is the national security correspondent for Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @JordanSchachtel.

Also see:

How Trump can pull us back from the abyss of terrorism

Jagoush | Getty Images

Conservative Review, by Daniel Horowitz, June 5, 2017:

“We stand with our European allies, but we will not walk in their footsteps and repeat their mistakes.” That is the message the president must convey to the American people in light of the growing Islamic insurgency in the West.

Like the story of the frog in gradually boiling water, we become acclimated to the most potent and dangerous absurdities foisted upon us by the political elite. No other generation of western leaders would have allowed the Islamic insurgency to fester within their own countries for this long and still remain willfully blind to the existential threat within their midst. Yet here we are, in the aftermath of the third major terror attack in England, and none of the western leaders are willing to confront the truth. President Trump has come the closest to telling the truth, but unless he shows leadership beyond Twitter and hires staff and appoints cabinet members who share his values, the discernable policy outcomes of this administration will remain materially the same.

It’s time we recognize that the problem confronting Europe – one that is also rapidly growing in America – is not terrorism. It’s not Islamic terrorism, either. Terrorism is a tactic and the violent outcome of the problem. The source of the problem is a subversive culture of Islamic supremacism that rejects western civilization and is endemic to many (but not all) Muslims, not just a few. It is from this root that the deadly tactic of Islamic terror is cultivated. But if we tolerate the intolerant supremacist mindset and continue our suicidal immigration policies, we are merely chasing our tail combatting the ubiquitous and unstoppable terrorism that flows from cultivating this culture on our soil.

The problem we face in the West is not ISIS. That group has only been around for a few years and does not have a military capable of striking the West. What it does have, like other terror groups or freelance jihadis, is the ability to inspire Muslims with supremacist proclivities living in the West to attack their home countries. But why are they so easily inspired, and why are so many of them admitted into western countries to begin with?

This problem didn’t begin with ISIS; it’s been festering for several decades. At its core, this is an immigration problem, and second, it’s a problem of the Muslim Brotherhood/Saudi Arabia/Turkey funding of Islamic insurrection on western soil. In fact, according to the U.K. Telegraph, one of the London Bridge terrorists was radicalized by watching videos of Imam Ahmad Musa Jibril, who lives not in Raqqa but in…Dearborn, Michigan!

According to British intelligence, the U.K. is now home to 23,000 jihadis. This is no longer an issue of a few foreign terrorist organizations penetrating our shores in order to commit 9/11-style isolated attacks. This is a long-term homegrown problem in which western countries have imported the Middle East and all its problems. It will only metastasize over time.

Lest you think this problem is limited to Europe, remember that former FBI Director James Comey testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee last month that there were 2,000-plus “violent extremist investigations” under way and that about 300 of them were refugees! One can only imagine the true depth of the problem, which we would understand better if we had an FBI that wasn’t willfully blind to this reality. The Minneapolis Somali community alone has become an enclave of supremacist ideology. Last year, U.S. Attorney Andrew Lugar warned that there is “a terror-recruiting problem in Minnesota” among the Somali youth and that it does not stem from overseas but “may be their best friend right here in town.” Similarly, a federal judge warned earlier this month, “This community needs to understand there is a jihadist cell in this community. Its tentacles spread out.”

The president must lay this case before the American people in a series of prime-time speeches and demand action from Congress while promising to do everything he can administratively. He must follow up on his campaign promises not to focus on nation-building overseas, but on the homeland security problems right on our shores. We could drop a nuclear bomb on Raqqa tomorrow or continue our involvement in the endless Islamic sectarian civil wars in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, and Somalia, but it won’t make us any safer if we continue to import the values of those countries to our shores and then allow the Saudis, Erdogan, and the Muslim Brotherhood to fan the flames of Islamic supremacism on our shores. Those are the “boots on the ground” we should be discussing.

To that end, Trump should lay out the following initiatives:

    • Immigration pause: Stop calling it a “travel ban,” which connotes restrictions on Americans. Call it what it is – a partial pause in immigration. Trump must make the case that we are importing record numbers of immigrants and students from the Middle East – as many as 160,000 a year. He needs to make the case that assimilation can only be successful if we focus on Americanizing those already here first.
    • Kick the courts out of immigration: What about the courts? Trump must call upon Congress to exercise Article III, Sec. II powers over the courts to strip them of any ill-gotten power to unilaterally violate our national sovereignty. He must also explain how the courts have no ability to set the refugee cap, even by their own admission. To further push back against the courts, Trump should demand that Congress cut off all funding for refugee resettlement (and use the savings for the wall as well). Despite calling it a “dumb idea” on the campaign trail, Trump has agreed to bring in up to 1,250 refugees from Australia, refugees whom even the liberal Aussies rejected! He must find consistency on this issue.
    • Implement visa tracking: Since 1996, Congress has passed numerous laws calling for an exit-entry visa tracking system, yet failed to provide funding for it. DHS just reported that only one percent of visa overstays are caught. In 2014, ABC News reported that DHS has lost track of 58,000 foreign students who have overstayed their visas, of which 6,000 presented a “heightened concern.” This is a clear and present danger in this era, and it would be indefensible for Democrats to block a legislative remedy.
    • Cut off aid to the PLO: Where did vehicular and stabbing jihad begin? With the Palestinians, of course. In Israel, PLO terrorists are rewarded by Mahmoud Abbas for doing exactly what was done in London over the weekend. Yet we’re subsidizing them with our taxpayer funding, and Trump himself is treating Abbas as a legitimate state leader instead of a terrorist. It’s not too late to become consistent on this issue and demand that Congress pass the Taylor Force Act, named after a Texan killed in Israel by a Palestinian stabber, in order to cut off aid to Abbas.
    • Cut off Saudi/Turkey/and Muslim Brotherhood influence: Trump should designate the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group, the subject of an executive order sitting on his desk that he has thus far declined to sign. He should also push Rep. Dave Brat’s bill prohibiting foreign governments from funding religion in this country when they lack freedom of religion in their countries. This poisonous subversion on our soil is more dangerous than any ISIS cell in Syria.
    • National right to carry: The hallmark of all these attacks in Europe is that the terrorists are the only ones with weapons. They are able to mow down innocent people with impunity. Trump must make the case that America will be different and we will defend ourselves. There is no better time to push for the already popular idea of having concealed-carry reciprocity between the states.
    • Deport hostile non-citizen immigrants: Non-citizens have free speech rights in the sense that they cannot be imprisoned for hateful (but non-treasonous) speech. But they can and must be deported. Any non-citizen attempting to incite hatred or violence against America should live somewhere they feel comfortable. Under current law, “any immigrant who is or has been a member of or affiliated with the communist or other totalitarian party (or subdivision or affiliate thereof), domestic or foreign, is inadmissible.” [212(a)(3)(D)(iv).] Congress must apply this to Islamic supremacists. Any non-citizen imam who is preaching hatred doesn’t need to be here. Moreover, even those who are citizens must be warned that when their hatred reaches the level of incitement during a time of war, we have always treated such behavior as treason. This certainly requires complete due process, but we can’t disregard the fact that wars have consequences. If we are in a state of war that is getting our soldiers killed in Yemen and Somalia, we are in a state of war that should prevent people on our shores from preaching support for our enemies. This, rather than the entire Russia investigation issue, should be the main focus in the search for a new FBI director.

Finally, what we need from the president is leadership. Sending out a few tweets is not enough. He needs to be consistent, relentless, and specific and see his policies all the way through. He must get his entire administration on the same page and fire those who are unwilling to go along with his agenda. His united team should then demand of congressional Republicans very specific legislation along the lines of the aforementioned principles. Then the president must sell them to the American people in a series of televised addresses. He could go over the heads of the media by broadcasting a Facebook Live from the Oval Office and giving high-profile addresses across the country. He should ask Speaker Ryan for another invitation to speak before Congress. His last speech before Congress won him universal accolades, even from the media

Stay principled, stay consistent, and stay on message. That is leadership. We will never get such leadership from McConnell and Ryan. That is why Trump was elected. Now is his moment to shine.

Daniel Horowitz is a senior editor of Conservative Review. Follow him on Twitter @RMConservative.

***

Ann Corcoran at Refugee Resettlement Watch:

You will be hearing more from me going forward on the specific legislation needed to scrap or reform the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program.  But, I tell you that the Republican ‘leadership’ in Congress will not lead on this and will have to be dragged kicking and screaming to lift a finger to reform/re-write the Refugee Act of 1980.

In my view, there is only one thing the President can do to move Congress on the issue and that is to put a complete halt to the USRAP. He must set the refugee admissions level at zero! And, leave it there until reform measures are passed by Congress!

And, here is the truth:  if he makes no move along those lines, or the additional lines addressed by Horowitz, he will be blamed for a Manchester in America (not Ryan, not McConnell, not the refugee contractors, not the ‘deep state’ blocking his moves, not the media or the Leftwing).

The blame will be on DJT exclusively.

If he visibly fights now and makes it clear who exactly is working to undermine our safety and our cultural identity, should (God forbid) a terrorist attack happen, the citizens of America will know he was trying to protect us.  Right now, I’m not so sure he is!

Trump: In wake of latest Islamic terror attack, come on Supremes! we need the travel ban

Refugee Resettlement Watch,  by Ann Corcoran on June 4, 2017:

….And, although he didn’t say it (yet?), we should all be urging that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg recuse herself due to her outrageous and injudicious comments about Donald Trump during his campaign for the Presidency.  After all, the justices will be deciding a case that hinges almost completely on Trump’s campaign comments. What about hers!

Here is quintessential Trump on twitter since last night’s terror attack in London:

On Thursday, I am sure you know that the Trump Justice Department appealed the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals decision on the temporary so-called travel ban from six Muslim majority countries. (Obviously that is what Trump is talking about in that tweet last night.)

I want to impress upon readers again that the 4th Circuit only addressed the ban on travel (for any class of traveler/immigrant/refugee) from the six countries shown here at right. The Maryland case did not address the refugee CEILING and the power of the President to set it (and change it!).

It was the Hawaii judge (case before the 9th Circuit) that addressed the overall 120-day refugee moratorium that would have applied to all countries and all ethnic and religious groups as well as addressing the reduction in the overall CEILING for FY17 from Obama’s dream number (110,000) to 50,000.

The 9th Circuit has not yet (as of this writing) handed down its decision. It has been my contention all along that the President did not need the EO to reset the CEILING on refugee admissions or to halt the entire program for 120 days, and I expect an honest 9th Circuit to throw out that portion of the Hawaii judge’s decision.

The DOJ’s appeal of the 4th Circuit decision to the Supreme Court is being expedited.  See reports here, here and here about the case (s).

Here is the text of the 4th Circuit ruling.

Travel ban will not rid us of Islamic terrorists already here.

(Remember, former FBI director Comey, in his last testimony to Congress said there are 300 US refugees being watched by the FBI!)

There are calls for Justice Ginsburg to recuse herself from Trump travel ban case because her animus toward the President has been so evident.

In my opinion there is an inordinate amount of emphasis being placed on temporary slowdowns on entry to the US and not enough on pressuring the US Muslim ‘leadership’ to get their people, who live here already, under control because in fact, many terror attacks and  thwarted terror attacks (and those extremists being watched) here involve second generation Muslim immigrants/refugees who were radicalized in their homes and mosques on US soil!

Maybe, a halt to Muslim immigration and refugee admissions could serve as an impetus for them to get their house in order!  It is worth trying to find out!

I’m not holding my breath that the Muslim ‘community’ will reform itself.

But, by limiting Presidential power which a ruling against Trump will do, there will be even greater long-term ramifications for keeping the country safe for decades to come (no matter who is President).

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg should not hear the case!

There is an excellent legal argument here  (read it!) suggesting that she is so biased against Donald Trump that she should recuse herself from the case.  Really the heart of the 4th Circuit case is whether Donald Trump’s campaign rhetoric can be used to dismiss an important policy decision. So, she shouldn’t be able to sit in judgement of campaign statements and be looking in to his heart!

*** We admitted 4,554 refugees from the six countries the Trump Administration (and before it the Obama Administration) recognized as terror-producing countries.

However, I submit that it was a huge mistake to leave out Afghanistan, Burma (Rohingya), Eritrea, Ethiopia, Pakistan, Uzbekistan and Iraq, and possibly others! By the way, there are many other immigration/visa programs admitting entry from these countries besides the UN/US Refugee Admissions Program.

These are the refugee numbers from the six known terror breeding grounds since January 20th up to today:

Iran (808) I didn’t check today, but most Iranians we take are not Muslims

Libya (0)

Somalia (1,668)

Sudan (425)

Syria (1,637)

Yemen (16)