The purge of a report on radical Islam has put NYC at risk

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New York Post, by Paul Sperry, April 15, 2017:

The NYPD has had a stellar track record of protecting the city from another 9/11, foiling more than 20 planned terrorist attacks since 2001. But some worry the department is losing its terror-fighting edge as it tries to please Muslim grievance groups.

Last year, for instance, it censored an anti-terror handbook to appease offended Muslims, even though it has accurately predicted radicalization patterns in recent “homegrown” terror cases. Rank-and-file NYPD officers, detectives and even intelligence and counterterrorism units are officially barred now from referring to the handbook or the scientific study on which it was based.

Former law-enforcement officials fear its removal as a training tool may be hurting efforts to prevent terrorist activity, such as the vehicle-ramming attacks plaguing European cities.

“The report was extremely accurate on how the radicalization process works and what indicators to look for,” said Patrick Dunleavy, former deputy inspector general of the New York state prisons’ criminal-intelligence division, who also worked with the NYPD’s intelligence division for several years.

Mayor de Blasio agreed in January 2016 to purge the remarkably prescient police training guide “Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat” to help settle a federal lawsuit filed by the ACLU and Muslim groups who claimed the NYPD’s anti-terror training discriminated against Muslims.

Written 10 years ago, the seminal NYPD report detailing the religious steps homegrown terrorists take toward radicalization is now more relevant than ever, with recent terror suspects closely following those steps. But in 2007, the same year the study was released, the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) organized a protest against it, complaining it “casts suspicion on all US Muslims.” Even though federal law enforcement has long-shunned CAIR as a suspected terrorist front organization, “groups like CAIR were insistent on having it removed, and de Blasio caved into them,” Dunleavy said.

Under the city’s unusual settlement agreement, the NYPD as well as New York state agencies were forced to remove its 90-page anti-terror study — described by plaintiffs as “deeply flawed” and “inflammatory” — from databases and no longer rely on it “to open or extend investigations” into terrorist activities. Also, police must now commit to “mitigating the potential impact” of any counterterrorism investigation on the Muslim community.

The deal has had a chilling effect on other city police forces’ ability to use fact-based, trend analysis to develop terrorism cases, experts say. They warn that purging such studies deprives local law enforcement of the ability to understand how ISIS and other jihadists recruit, organize and operate — which is critical to disrupting terrorism plots.

“The FBI has its hands full with over 1,000 open cases on ISIS terrorist suspects already in the US,” former FBI Agent John Guandolo said, “and it needs the help of well-trained eyes and ears on the ground at the local and state level.”

“The bad guys know if police don’t know this stuff at the ground level, they win,” added Guandolo, who trains sheriffs departments across the country to ID local jihadi networks through his consulting firm, Understanding the Threat LLC.

The authors of the report, led by Mitch Silber, former NYPD director of intelligence analysis, examined hundreds of “homegrown” terrorism cases and found that suspects followed the same “radicalization” path. Key indicators include: alienating themselves from their former lives and friends; giving up cigarettes, drinking and partying; wearing traditional Islamic clothing; growing a beard; becoming obsessed with Mideast politics and jihad; and regularly attending a hardline mosque. In other words, the more they immersed themselves in their faith, the more radical they grew.

“You can take all the terrorist cases since that report and compare the information on the subject and the case and see stark similarities to what Mitch laid out,” Dunleavy noted.

The terrorists who carried out recent attacks in Boston; Fort Hood, Texas; Little Rock, Ark.; Chattanooga, Tenn.; San Bernardino, Fla.; Orlando; Philadelphia and at Ohio State University, among others, followed a similar pattern of radicalization. In each case, the Muslim attacker was influenced through “incubators of extremism” within the Muslim community, including Islamic student associations, schools, bookstores and mosques. Jihadi websites also played a role, but what unifies them all is Islamic doctrine. As the NYPD study found, “The ultimate objective for any attack is always the same — to punish the West, overthrow the democratic order, re-establish the caliphate, and institute Sharia,” or Islamic law.

“The radicalizer is Sharia, not the Internet,” said Philip Haney, a former Homeland Security counterterrorism analyst. Haney says the feds are plagued by their own PC censorship. Bowing to pressure from CAIR and other Muslim groups, Homeland Security and the Justice Department have purged anti-terrorism training materials and fired instructors deemed offensive to Muslims. CAIR-launched protests also helped convince the FBI to recently suspend an Internet program aimed at preventing the radicalization of Muslim youth.

“If we fail to correct this situation, it is inevitable that more attacks will occur,” warned Haney, author of “See Something, Say Nothing.”

The NYPD did not respond to requests for comment.

Paul Sperry, a former Hoover Institution media fellow, is the author of several books on terrorism including the best-seller “Infiltration.”

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The report is available on Amazon in paperback:

 

Jihad in the Amazon.com

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Online retail giant Amazon.com is profiting from the sale of speeches and writings by one of the world’s most notorious terrorists despite objections from those who argue the website is facilitating the dissemination of jihadist propaganda.

The works of terrorist mastermind Anwar al-Awlaki are easily purchased in print, CD, and on Kindle e-readers via Amazon’s site.

Al-Awlaki’s materials are not being sold by Amazon directly but via third parties in the Amazon Marketplace, which acts as a clearinghouse for books, videos, and CDs. Amazon acts as an intermediary and facilitates the sale, taking a portion of the proceeds in the process.

Amazon has failed to remove the writings following multiple appeals from United States terrorism experts who argue that the international online store is aiding the spread of terrorism.

Read more at Free Beacon

Germany Launches Campaign to Counter Islamic Radicalization

by: Soeren Kern:

The German government has launched a nationwide poster campaignaimed at fighting against the radicalization of young Muslim immigrants.

The ad campaign is the brainchild of German Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich, who has been leading Germany’s multifaceted response (here, here and here) to the rise of radical Islam there.

Beginning on September 21, the posters, which feature photos of four different Muslims under the caption “MISSING,” will be put up in the immigrant areas in Germany’s large cities (mainly in Berlin, Hamburg and Bonn), and will feature text in German, Turkish and Arabic.

The Interior Ministry says the posters — which feature a helpline telephone number for worried acquaintances and relatives — are designed to “counter radicalization” and “provide support.”

One of the posters includes the word “MISSING” in very large print above a portrait of a young man with dark hair and reads: “This is our son Ahmad. We miss him, because we do not recognize him anymore. He is withdrawing more and more, becoming more radical every day. We are afraid of losing him altogether — to religious fanatics and terrorist groups.”

Similar fictional “MISSING” posters feature “my brother Hassan,”“Missing” “my friend Fatima,” and “our son Tim.”

All of the ads include an appeal to phone the “Radicalization Advice Center,” known in German as the Beratungsstelle Radikalisierung, which was launched on January 1, 2012. It is part of an initiative called “Security Partnership: Working Together with Muslims for Security,” which the German Interior Ministry hopes will “counter the Islamist radicalization of young people.”

According to documentation published by the anti-radicalization center, “Parents, relatives, friends and teachers are often the first to notice that a young person is becoming radicalized, and are also often the last people with whom a young person maintains contact despite becoming increasingly isolated. In order to provide them with the best possible support in such a difficult situation and so to jointly counter the radicalization of the people close to you, professional consulting services are now available.”

The text continues: “German Interior Minister Friedrich, within the framework of the ‘Prevention Summit’ on June 24, 2011, confirmed that the radicalization of Muslim youth and young adults by Islamist groups would be resolutely pursued. The counseling center is an important element of this. Those within the social environment of the affected individuals are usually the first to notice when a son, student, friend or colleague change their religious attitude or even their entire worldview, increasingly withdraw from their existing environment, turn off from their past and embrace a radical spectrum, and are increasingly guided by ideologies that are incompatible with the principles of a liberal democratic state.”

“Missing”According to the center, the victims “often pull back sharply from their previous environment and refuse to ‘mix’ anymore. This leads to friends, but especially parents, to uncertainty: they are in a conflict between the potentially welcome religiosity of the child and the concomitant concern that their child might fall into the ‘wrong circles’ and that they might lose contact with them. This is especially true for non-Muslim parents, whose children have converted to Islam, and who have many questions about Islam as a religion.”

The text concludes: “In these cases, professional advice is important and necessary. It is important to recognize the problem as such and to accept to resolve pressing issues and finally to consider ways to counter the radicalization process. The ‘Radicalization Advice Center’ at the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees is in close contact with various consultancies and knows contact persons as well as networks for special topics in all areas. The offer of counseling is for all citizens provided free of charge.”

According to the Interior Ministry, the Radicalization Advice Center is currently handling about 20 cases, mostly involving German parents whose children have converted to Islam. The objective of the poster campaign, which will cost about €300,000 ($375,000), is to reach out to Muslim parents who may be concerned about the radicalization of their children.

Read more at Radical Islam

Soeren Kern is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the New York-based Gatestone Institute. He is also Senior Fellow for European Politics at the Madrid-based Grupo de Estudios Estratégicos / Strategic Studies Group. Follow him on Facebook.

Video Exposes Northeastern University’s Muslim Chaplain as an Islamist Extremist

By CHARLES  JACOBS:

Americans for Peace and Tolerance (APT) today released a video  (www.nuextremism.com) showing Northeastern  University’s Muslim Chaplain, Imam  Abdullah Faaruuq to be a supporter of convicted Islamist terrorists, and a  religious leader who is inciting Boston Muslims against the U.S government.

“Our video shows that there is a culture of extremism at the Islamic Society of  Northeastern University (ISNU) – the Muslim student group on campus under the  leadership of its spiritual advisor, Imam Faaruuq,” said human rights activist  Dr. Charles Jacobs, APT President.

Just days after a description of the  findings documented in the video were published in the Boston Jewish Advocate,  and the video’s imminent public release was announced, Imam Faaruuk’s page on  the Northeastern website was removed.

Charles Jacobs, President of APT  said, “His relationship with Northeastern University has been terminated.” We  commend Northeastern’s President Joseph Aoun for this, but more needs to be  done. We need to understand how this was allowed to persist for years, and we  need to be sure there are processes in place to monitor and correct any  teachings of hate at the University.

APT’s video, “Islamic Extremism @  Northeastern University,” (www.nuextremism.com) describes Imam Faaruuq’s history  of extremism. In the early 1990s, Faaruuq developed an association with Aafia  Siddiqui, Pakistani born, young MIT student and one of the most active members  of an Al Qaeda cell of activists who were followers of the Egyptian Blind Sheikh  Omar Abdel-Rahman, the convicted mastermind of the 1993 World  Trade Center  bombing. Aafia attended Faaruuq’s Boston mosque and worked with Faaruuq to  distribute Jihadist literature to Massachussetts prisons, where he had also  served as a Muslim chaplain.
In 2004, FBI Director Robert Mueller described  Aafia Siddiqui as one of the seven most wanted Al Qaeda terrorists. In 2008  Siddiqui was arrested in Afghanistan and charged with attempted murder of FBI  agents. In her possession were plans for a chemical attack on New York City and  a large amount of cyanide. In 2010, she was convicted and sentenced to 86 years  in jail.

In lectures around Boston, Faaruuq has called on Boston  Muslims to defend Siddiqui because “after they’re finished with Aafia, they’re  gonna come to your door.” He told worshippers to not be afraid to “grab onto the  gun and the sword, go out into this world and do your job.”

Read more at Family Security Matters

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Germany Fights Back

Map of Lower Saxony

By Soeren Kern

The German state of Lower Saxony has published a practical guide to extremist Islam to help citizens identify tell-tale signs of Muslims who are becoming radicalized.

Security officials say the objective of the document is to mitigate the threat of home-grown terrorist attacks by educating Germans about radical Islam and encouraging them to refer suspected Islamic extremists to the authorities.

The move reflects mounting concern in Germany over the growing assertiveness of Salafist Muslims, who openly state that they want to establish Islamic Sharia law in the country and across Europe.

The 54-page document, “Radicalization Processes in the Context of Islamic Extremism and Terrorism,” which provides countless details about the Islamist scene in Germany, paints a worrisome picture of the threat of radical Islam there.

The document states: “The threat posed by Islamic terrorist organizations continues apace, and the risk of radicalization and recruitment by Islamists continues unabated. Young Muslims are being courted by Islamist propaganda. The threat level in Western countries has escalated to a higher level. A particular risk increasingly stems from self-radicalized individuals or small groups without formal networks of connections. This poses special problems for law enforcement. The long-term strategic objective of these Islamist organizations is to destabilize democratically and liberally oriented states and to influence political decision-making.”

The document continues: “Islamist terrorism poses a significant threat to the internal security of Germany. National security authorities have identified at least 235 Islamists with German citizenship who have sought or received paramilitary training in places such as Afghanistan, Pakistan and Somalia. It is assumed that more than half of these individuals have returned to Germany. Of these, approximately ten are currently in prison. There is a very real danger that these individuals have returned to Germany with the aim of committing acts of terrorism.”

According to the report, German security agencies estimate that approximately 1,140 individuals living in Germany pose a high risk of becoming Islamic terrorists. The document also states that up to 100,000 native Germans have converted to Islam in recent years, and that “intelligence analysis has found that converts are especially susceptible to radicalization…Security officials believe that converts comprise between five to ten percent of the Salafists.”

The document provides a frank assessment of political Islam. It describes Islamism as “a political ideology that disputes the constitutional order of the Federal Republic of Germany. Unlike secular extremist ideologies like Communism or National Socialism, which are not based on religious ideas, Islamism is based on the religion of Islam. At the core, Islamists advocate a politicized form of Islam. Religion for them is not only an individual matter of faith, but Islam is seen as a comprehensive political-religious societal concept. Islamist organizations and movements, despite their differences, all seek to create societies based on the legal system of Sharia. This law divides people according to their beliefs, their gender and their relationship to the Islamic state in different legal categories. It rejects the idea of democratically legitimized governance, particularly by non-Muslims over Muslims, because only Allah is recognized as a sovereign. Thus Islamism, with its strict commitment to Sharia, is directed against the Constitution and the rights and freedoms guaranteed therein, equality and respect for human rights. The Islamic idea of a theocratic state and social system is also opposed to the principle of popular sovereignty and the separation of powers.”

The document also includes a list of 26 “possible characteristics of radicalization processes” to help German citizens identify potential radicalization.

Some of the items on the list include: “critical questions about Islam are viewed as an attack on the addressed person or group; questioning certain views on the interpretation of Islam is interpreted as a betrayal of the group; increasingly stringent interpretation of religion; rejection or aggression against anything “Western;” Islam is the solution, the so-called Western world is seen as the cause for all the problems; dualistic worldview, applying a strict friend-foe schema; repeating Islamist slogans; religious strictness is required of the entire society; Muslims with different orientation (that is, Shiites) are called infidels.”

Other items on the list include: “visiting radical mosques or Islamic or preachers; participating in religious seminaries with radical preachers; solidifying contacts with other radical extremists and individuals; visiting Islamist websites; watching films that promote violent jihad; increasing willingness to aggressively and violently enforce religious or religiously colored political claims on others (possibly by also increasing interest in weapons); potentially criminal activity against property and persons with reference to the inferiority of the so-called infidels and/or committed to harm the alleged enemies of Islam; implementation of survival training, combat training or similar paramilitary activities; frequent and/or lengthy trips to countries with majority Muslim populations, particularly language classes, visits to paramilitary training camps; preoccupation with life after death or martyrdom; changes in financial position (no verifiable income or sudden debt).”

Not surprisingly, the document has been greeted with outrage by Muslims, who have accused the government of Lower Saxony of “scare-mongering.” The opposition Social Democratic Party (SPD) has described it as “absurd” and “outrageous.”

Interior Minister Uwe Schünemann has rejected the criticism; he says he has no intention of withdrawing the document, which is part of a concerted strategy by German officials to step up their monitoring of Salafist groups after a series of violent clashes with police.

Read more at Radical Islam

Soeren Kern is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the New York-based Gatestone Institute. He is also Senior Fellow for European Politics at the Madrid-based Grupo de Estudios Estratégicos / Strategic Studies Group. Follow him on Facebook

Report downplays Islamic role in Fort Hood jihadi attack

By Neil Munro

No government officials should be penalized for their inaction while they  watched an online al-Qaida organizer persuade U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan  to murder twelve of his fellow soldiers at Foot Hood in 2009, says the final  report of an independent panel.

“Although we are critical of certain actions and omissions, we do not regard  any of those actions to be misconduct that would warrant administrative or  disciplinary action,” said the third-last paragraph on the 150-page report,  titled “Final Report of the William H. Webster Commission.”

“Some missteps occurred because there was no stated policy or binding  directive in place that would have required different actions … [but] absent  formal policy guidance on the assignment and resolution of Routine leads, the  delay cannot be said to involve misconduct,” said the paragraph.

The report was overseen by William Webster, who headed the FBI from 1978 to  1987.

The report was distributed July 20 with the announcement that Republican Rep.  Frank Wolfe will hold a August 1 committee hearing on the report. The witness  will include an FBI official, Mark Giuliano, who is the executive assistant  director of the FBI’s National Security Branch.

The report says Hasan yelled the Islamic war-cry — “Allahu akbar!” which  means “Allah is supreme” — as he shot his fellow Americans in Fort Hood.

On his business card, Hasan described himself as a “soldier of Allah,” who is the Muslim god.

In place of Islamic texts, the report blames Hasan’s self-described religious  motivation on a non-religious psychological process of “violent  radicalization.”

On page seven, the report declares that “most terrorists are psychologically  normal as individuals, and do not fit a medical diagnostic category.” However,  the report argues that “radicalization occurs when followers submit to the  collective identity and leaders identify a shared enemy as a target for violent  behavior.”

The report did not treat Islamic radicalization as a subset of radicalization  amid the many jihadi attacks on U.S. civilians and soldiers, but instead lumped  it under a very broad category of “radicalization.”

“Radicalization — whether based on religious, political, social, or other  causes — challenges the capability and capacity of the FBI and other members of  the U.S. Intelligence Community to identify, collect, analyze, and act on  accurate intelligence in time to detect and deter those who would commit  violence,” says the report.

To combat “radicalization,” the report urges the FBI to increase information  sharing, buy better computers and better protect suspects’ privacy.

Non-religious radicalization!? Protect the suspect’s privacy?! Huh?!

Read more at Daily Caller