Rift Between Police, Feds Allowed New Mexico Terror Compound To Fester

The compound was under surveillance from both local and federal law enforcement, but it took several months for law enforcement to intervene despite local reports.

The Federalist, by Kyle Shideler September 14, 2018:

Questions keep coming about how the U.S. justice system responded to a New Mexico compound that housed five alleged would-be jihadists and 11 reportedly malnourished children along with the remains of a twelfth child who died on the compound.

A federal grand jury recently indicted the five alleged jihadists on weapons and conspiracy charges, alleging the group created their compound in the desert outside Taos, New Mexico as a training camp and firing range to facilitate a “Common plan to prepare for violent attacks government, military, educational and financial institutions” and sought to “engage in jihad and form an army of jihad” according to the federal indictment published by the Department of Justice on September 11.

The five suspects—Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, Lucas Morten, Subhanah Wahhaj, Hujrah Wahhaj, and Jany Leveille—had previously faced state charges of child abuse, but the charges floundered in court after a New Mexico judge dismissed charges against all five suspects when state prosecutors missed a 10-day deadline for a preliminary hearing. Prosecutors argued extenuating circumstancesbut were rebuffed.

The federal charges echo information first laid out in the state prosecutors’ motionurging the judge in the case to reconsider the judge’s dismissal of bail, given evidence that the suspects had discussed targeted attacks against “corrupt institutions,” including schools and an Atlanta-area hospital. Suspects reportedly had repeatedly discussed a willingness to fight and kill law enforcement, and to die as “martyrs.” Prosecutors cited testimony from children inside the camp saying they were being trained to conduct school shootings or other attacks.

The five suspects were arrested after local police launched a raid to respond to reports of child abuse from inside the camp, only to discover a shooting range, multiple weapons, and documents describing a potential terrorist attack, including a document titled “Phases of a Terrorist Attack.”

Neighbors Were Telling Police Disturbing Information

The federal charges highlight what appears to have been a disconnect between state and federal law enforcement over how to address the New Mexico compound and its armed residents. The compound was under surveillance from both local and federal law enforcement, but it took several months for law enforcement to intervene despite reports from the local community.

Sirraj Ibn Wahhaj faced a Georgia-issued child abduction warrant, and neighbors reportedly identified the missing child, Abdul Ghani, who was known to possess a limp. A child with a limp was also reportedly detected by FBI aerial surveillance.

Taos County Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe has told media that local authorities didn’t intervene over concerns they lacked probable cause to act. But CNN reported that a local officertold neighbors law enforcement’s “hands were tied” by the FBI.

“‘We’ve gotten multiple calls on this child but, at the same time, our hands are tied because the FBI has whatever they got going on up there with them,’” CNN quoted the officer as saying, according to a recording the news channel acquired.

This would not be the first case in which a disconnect between federal and local officials led to potential danger for a local community. In Garland, Texas, a free speech protest and cartoon contest on May 3, 2015 was targeted by two Islamic State-linked jihadists armed with rifles, Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi. The attack took place while an undercover FBI agent shadowed the two attackers and took pictures.

While the FBI says they warned Garland police that the two may have had an interest in the target, police guarding the event say they were never warned of an impending assault. Simpson and Soofi injured a security guard before being shot dead by a quick-acting Garland police officer.

Failing to Intercept ‘Known Wolves’

Repeated incidents of western law enforcement agencies having detailed intelligence on terror suspects, yet failing to prevent attacks has led to the use of the term “Known Wolves” by policy critics, who say agencies aren’t doing enough to preempt terrorism by those under surveillance.

Feelings of mutual distrust between local and federal law enforcement linger, despite the Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF) system intended to incorporate local and state law enforcement with the FBI’s efforts. While local law enforcement complains of having hands tied or being left uninformed of dangerous jihadists in their midst, federal law enforcement sometimes sees local law enforcement as compromised.

Examples include Fairfax County Police officer Weiss Rasool, who in 2005 allegedly searched police databases and tipped off terror suspects, who were preparing to fleewhen federal law enforcement swooped in to make an arrest. And in 2009 FBI agents fumed when a local imam tipped off Najibullah Zazi, the leader of a three-person terror cell plotting bombings in New York City. The imam had been contacted by New York Police Department officers looking for intel.

While federal authority over terrorism cases predominates, the New Mexico case feeds local law enforcement’s growing perception that they can’t assume the FBI has the situation under control. It also indicates the difficulties for local law enforcement when complicated cases with possible terror links are suddenly thrust into their laps.

It’s local law enforcement, not federal agents, who remain most likely to receive community tips, and to recognize changes in their neighborhood beats. Local law enforcement is also more likely to be the first to spot tell-tale signs of criminal schemes to finance terrorism, or crimes like child or domestic abuse that may open a window of intervention, as occurred in the New Mexico case.

While investigators’ handling of the child abuse case in New Mexico raises concerns, the use of state-level terrorism prosecutions has seen significant success in states like neighboring Arizona, where counterterrorism laws do not require an “overt act” to prosecute, as federal terrorism laws do, making preemptive prosecutions of would-be jihadists more viable.

We should continue to expect better cooperation between all levels of law enforcement in the effort to defeat jihadist terror. But at the end of the day, local law enforcement should not accept having their “hands tied” from protecting their communities nor take a back seat on counterterrorism.

Kyle Shideler is the director of the Counter-Islamist Grid (CIG), which identifies, documents, and exposes Islamist networks operating in local communities.

“Terrorist Attack” Manual Targeting Atlanta Hospital Found At New Mexico Jihad Compound

Zero Hedge, by Tyler Durden, August 26, 2018:

A handwritten document titled “Phases of a Terrorist Attack” was found at a New Mexico encampment where the son of a famous New York Imam allegedly murdered his three-year-old son and trained several children to commit acts of terrorism, reports CNN.

The handwritten document contained “instructions for ‘The one-time terrorist,‘ instructions on the use of a ‘choke point,’ a location ‘called the ideal attack site,’ the ‘ability to defend the safe haven,’ the ‘ability to escape-perimeter rings,’ and ‘sniper position detection procedure,'” according to the court filing.

Some of the children at the compound told police that Morten allegedly “stated he wished to die in Jihad, as a martyr,” prosecutors said in the motion.

“At times, Jany Leveille would laugh and joke about dying in Jihad as would Subhanna Wahhaj,” according to the court document. –CNN

Prosecutors have asked judge Sarah Backus to reconsider an order granting bond to five adults arrested at the compound – citing not only the death of three-year-old Abdul Ghani Wahhaj at the remote site, but also plans by the defendants to attack law enforcement and “specific targets such as teachers, schools, banks and other “corrupt” institutions.” 

The defense, meanwhile, has asked Backus to dismiss the charges

Despite authorities finding a dead child’s remains on the compound, and an alleged letter sent from one suspect to his brother inviting him to come to New Mexico and die as a martyr, Backus ruled that the state failed to meet the burden of showing the suspects were a danger to the community after several hours of testimony. She ordered the suspects – Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, 40, Lucas Morton, 40, Jany Leveille, 35, Hujrah Wahhaj, 37, and Subhannah Wahhaj, 35 – released on $20,000 signature bond, meaning they didn’t have to pay.

Backus drew harsh rebuke from prosecutors, law enforcement and New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, who said she “strongly disagreed” with the decision to release the suspects on signature bail. “Unfortunately, it highlights how extreme the New Mexico Supreme Court has been in dictating pretrial release for all kinds of dangerous criminals.”

Children from the compound told police that Jany Leveille, 35 – the partner of the dead boy’s father, Siraj Wahhaj, 40, “intended to confront ‘corrupt’ institutions or individuals, such as the military, big businesses, CIA, teachers/schools and reveal the ‘truth’ to these corrupt institutions or individuals.”

In particular, the Jihadis were targeting Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta – after Leveille in a journal “expressed her displeasure with Grady Hospital … due to the treatment she and her mother received there,” according to the document.

The dead boy’s father, Siraj Wahhaj, 40, and his partner, Jany Leveille, 35, have been charged with abuse of a child resulting in death, a first-degree felony with a penalty of up to life in prison, according to court documents. They were also charged with conspiracy to commit child abuse, also a first-degree felony.

The couple and three other adults — Wahhaj’s sisters, Hujrah Wahhaj and Subhannah Wahhaj; and Lucas Morten — were previously charged with 11 felony counts of child abuse. –CNN

Weapons Stash in Tunnel

CNN also reports that based on court filings, Siraj Wahhaj had “ordered the group to defend the compound with weapons in the event of a nighttime police raid.”

The children from the compound told investigators in recent interviews that a tunnel found on the property was to be used as an “escape route” if police found the compound.

The guns located at the exit of the tunnel were stored there … so that as the group exited the tunnel, the group could arm themselves with weapons and ammunition,” the document said.

Authorities have said the property included a makeshift shooting range. Police said they recovered an AR-15 rifle, loaded 30-round magazines, four loaded pistols and many rounds of ammunition.

The court document said two children told an FBI agent that they had been trained in “advanced firearms handling and had been instructed to shoot law enforcement personnel when the time came and that they would be instructed in the future to attack specific targets such as teachers, schools, banks and other ‘corrupt institutions.'” -CNN

Meanwhile, according to dashcam video and lapel audio obtained by CNN, the couple who owns the land, Tanya and Jason Badger, told a responding officer that the suspects had set up the compound – and had called authorities to report a possible missing child. The officer told the Badgers that one of the men living on the compound was on a “terror watch list,” yet local authorities declined to respond to calls over the missing child due to an ongoing FBI investigation.

“We’ve gotten multiple calls on this child but, at the same time, our hands are tied because the FBI has whatever they got going on up there with them,'” Officer Bryan Donis said in the recording.

“All I know is that he’s on the terrorist watch list,” Donis is heard saying.

“I know this boy is missing from Georgia and that this guy is on the terrorist watch list and that there is a group of people they’re (FBI) keeping an eye on for whatever reason.”

In mid-August, New Mexico authorities executed a court order to destroy the encampment.

NBC News reported that police seized an RV where eleven children and five adults lived in what was described as squalor, while also bulldozing the entrance to an underground tunnel where authorities found the decomposing body of three-year-old Abdul-ghani Wahha – placed there by the suspects in the hopes that he would resurrect as Jesus and use his psychic powers to help the group target “corrupt institutions and people” with “violent actions.”

Ammo and a bulletproof vest were discovered at the scene after the camp was broken down.

Taos County Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe said that during the initial serving of the search warrant, their tactical team came upon children holding boxes of ammo, and at least one child was armed when he was found. The defendants’ attorney tried to downplay the “heavily armed” portion of the case.

While cross-examining of Hogrefe, the suspects’ defense attorneys each took their chance to try and distance the suspects as far from the weapons as possible, and the connotations of violence they imply. One defense attorney suggested it’s “prudent” that children learn how to use firearms safely, which Hogrefe agreed to.

The sheriff also confirmed that Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is investigating the legalities surrounding the occupants’ possession of firearms.

Another defense attorney pointed out, and Hogrefe confirmed, that the compound’s occupants did not shoot at the tactical team as they raided the compound. He did say, however, that Morton was “struggling” and “resisting” while being arrested by deputies. –KOB.com

For her decision to free the suspects, Backus says she has received over 200 threats, including death threats, which resulted in the evacuation of a New Mexico courthouse on Tuesday.

Backus has received more than 200 threats, according to Barry Massey, a spokesman for New Mexico Courts. Callers have threatened physical violence against Backus, including some people who threatened to slit Backus’ throat and smash her head, Massey said. People also lashed out on social media and also threatened court staff, Massey said. –CNN

Backus has been called an “Islamic terrorist sympathizer” and a “disgusting garbage human,” according to Massey.

SHOCKING RULING: Judge Releases NM Extremists

Clarion Project, by Ryan Mauro, August 14, 2018:

In a shocking ruling, a judge released four of the five adults arrested from the Islamic extremist compound in New Mexico that was raided last week.

Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, the father of the disabled boy who died from being denied his medication, is the only one still being held because he faces an additional charge since he was a fugitive.

Judge Sarah Backus ruled the prosecutors failed to prove the four individuals would pose a direct threat to the community and thus they did not need to be held until trial.

She released them to house arrest and on a $20,000 “signature bond,” which means they just have to sign a document promising to return to court when it is time for trial. If they do not show up to court, they will face arrest and be required to pay $20,000 as a penalty.

All five suspects – Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, Hujrah Wahhaj, Subhannah Wahhaj, Lucas “Luqman” Morton and Jany Leveille—have been charged with 11 counts of child abuse. Siraj Ibn Wahhaj has an additional charge of being a fugitive due to an arrest warrant in Georgia. Morton was also charged with one count of harboring a fugitive for refusing to tell police where Siraj was.

Backus ruled they must reside in acceptable living conditions, wear ankle monitors at all times, cannot have firearms, cannot leave the country and can only see their children if they are supervised.

Law enforcement sources in New Mexico who spoke to Clarion Intelligence Network were shocked and dismayed, wondering out loud what it would have taken for the judge to see the threat that they pose.

There have been many times where criminals have been on house arrest with the same exact charges as the compound residents and have cut off their ankle monitors and escaped for years, one source explained. They emphasized that house arrest does not eliminate the threat.

A Muslim source, who has closely followed the situation with the Wahhaj family for months, was similarly shocked, especially the release of Jany Leveille, the second wife of Siraj Ibn Wahhaj.

“Jany Leveille, who they called ‘Maryam,’ was the ringleader of this cult. You could argue she’s the most dangerous one,” he said.

Even More Details from the Prosecutors

What makes the release of the cult members even more baffling is that the prosecutors’ case for holding the suspects, based on the facts of the case alone, was solid.

“The evidence as a whole says this family was on a mission, and a violent one,” said prosecutor Tim Hassan.

Prosecutors released even more evidence into the proceeding to illustrate the threat posed by letting these individuals out of jail.

  • One of the suspects wrote a letter to his brother telling him to move to the compound and die as a “martyr” (meaning in violent combat)
  • One of the children was found holding a gun. He saidSiraj Ibn Wahhaj had told him to hold it and prepare to fire it during the raid. Others were holding boxes of ammunition. The boys did not open fire because Siraj Ibn Wahhaj told them to stand down
  • As reported earlier, at least one of the children was trained to carry out a school shooting
  • Abdul-Ghani Wahhaj, the deceased 3-year-old disabled boy, died from being denied his medication and lost his life during an Islamic prayer session to expel the demons they believed were inside him. The children said the boy choked and foamed at the mouth during these sessions and died in February
  • An FBI agent testified that one of the children said they believed the deceased boy would resurrect as Jesus in about four months and then inform the compound residents of their specific targets. He mentioned law enforcement personnel, educational institutions, financial institutions and banks as potential targets
  • One of the women believed Abdul-Ghani was meant to be her child but was stolen from her by his mother using black magic. She claimed to be receiving messages from the Angel Gabriel
  • The children were being trained to kill teachers, members of law enforcement and other people associated with “corrupt” institutions they were told should be overthrown. They learned how to fire and speed-load guns, clear rooms and were schooled in various forms of tactical training. They were originally told it was for defending the compound. The kids were also taught to preach their ideology to others and to kidnap or murder those who rejected it
  • A book at the compound taught how to make an AR-style gun untraceable
  • Siraj Ibn Wahhaj took multiple firearms classes at the Atlanta Firearms Training Center in Georgia in 2015. He also took a mysterious trip to Saudi Arabia in 2017. He told his wife that he was ending their marriage upon his return
  • The guns at the compound included an AR-15, a pistol, a .308 sniper rifle, a 30/30 and a glock
  • Taos County Sheriff Jerry Hogrefe said all five adults are refusing to cooperate with police
  • Although Lucas Morton did not open fire at law enforcement officials during the raid, he was “struggling” and “resisting” while being apprehended

How the Defense Defeated Common Sense

As is to be expected, the defense attorney for the five arrested extremists claimed they were the victims of discrimination against Muslims and blacks, arguing they may not have been arrested if they were white Christians.

The defense’s main argument was that there was no strong evidence of a specific terrorist plot, only aspirations. And somehow, that worked. The judge agreed that because the prosecutors could not lay out an actual plan, the threat wasn’t as high as they claimed. She also mentioned the defendants did not have a criminal history.

The lawyer also argued the fact that their guns were obtained legally, were found easily and not used to resist arrest shows they are not a threat to the community.

The defense also pointed out that Subhannah Wahhaj is seven months pregnant and there was no specific evidence linking her to violent activity. It was also argued that at least some of the women moved to New Mexico because of an unspecified threat to their safety. 

Conclusion

Four radical Islamic extremists—ones so radical that a typical radical describes them as an extremist cult—were released and now will be living among the residents of New Mexico.

As law enforcement personnel told us, the restrictions placed on them during house arrest are surmountable barriers, especially for jihadis willing to die for the cause and/or for someone who wants to avoid inevitable prison time.

Yes, the defendants will be monitored and intelligence will be gathered on them. But the defendants know this and have, in all probability, studied how to get around it.

Siraj Ibn Wahhaj may very well have learned these techniques through his security company in Georgia or through his father’s Islamist network.

While on house arrest, the defendants can communicate with one another and with others. They can have visitors. That means they can plan future action or even potentially escape. It is unlikely the authorities will have eyes inside their homes watching their movements, listening to their every word.

If this episode teaches us anything, it’s that the authorities are probably able to do much less than whatever you’re assuming.

In this, as in many cases, action obviously needed does not take place. Law enforcement authorities are either handcuffed by legal restrictions, bogged down by bureaucratic procedures, hampered by flaws in the system, deterred by political correctness, simply incompetent or lack resources. These factors don’t even account for the inevitable human error that happens in all complex operations.

Islamist extremists in America are watching this development, likely cheering the bewildering decision of this judge and encouraged by the weaknesses on display by the “Great Satan.”

Also see:

***

***

NM Tragedy: Could the FBI Have Saved the Boy?

Clarion Project, by Ryan Mauro, August 8, 2018:

The New Mexico authorities have announced heart-breaking news: The remains of a boy have been found at the Islamist compound that was raided on Friday.

It is almost certainly the body of disabled toddler Abdul-Ghani Wahhaj, who has been missing for nine months after being abducted by his father, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj, and brought to the compound with 11 other malnourished children.

The day the remains were found would have been his fourth birthday.

The pain one experiences from reading the story is increased exponentially by a reality that is difficult to accept: The boy might have been saved if the FBI had acted, instead of stalling until the New Mexico police finally went in on their own.

The Beginning

Abdul-Ghani Wahhaj went missing on December 1, 2017, abducted by his father, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj. The boy’s mother, Hakeemah Ramzi, went to the police. The boy’s parents had been married for 15 years, according to press reports. It is unclear what sparked the sudden rift within the Wahhaj family.

Siraj Ibn Wahhaj attributed his son’s disabilities to demonic beings and believed that only an Islamic exorcism would expel the demons, a fact reported by the Clarion Intelligence Network’s sources before it was confirmed publicly in a search warrant.

The boy’s medication was left behind, putting him in peril. Sources say the rejection of medical treatment points to the fact that the ideology held by Wahhaj and his co-conspirators stems not from traditional Islamism but to a cultish fringe.

The kidnapper is the son of radical Imam Siraj Wahhaj in Brooklyn, one of the most powerful Islamic leaders in the country. He heads the Masjid at-Tawa mosque and the Muslim Alliance in North America, both of which have a long history of extremism and ties to terrorism, including weapons training and acquirement.

Siraj Ibn Wahhaj and his co-conspirators likely learned their skills in this regard through this Islamist network even if they later had a falling out with Imam Wahhaj and joined a more fringe cult-like movement. Clarion Intelligence Network has been providing information to the necessary authorities in this regard.

He had also set up a security-related company as a front.

The boy was seen with his father and other adults and children in Alabama on December 13 at the scene of a car accident. They told the police officer on the scene they were going to New Mexico to go camping.

The Compound is Discovered

Press reports indicate the compound was first set up in late December. It is still unknown exactly why and when the spot was chosen. Our law enforcement sources are certain there is a bigger story behind it.

Neighbors saw Abdul-Ghani Wahhaj at the compound in January and February.

A couple, Jason and Tanya Badger, went to the police in late April or early May once they did an internet search of Siraj Ibn Wahhaj and discovered he was a wanted a fugitive and the boy was missing.

Furthermore, the Badgers were involved in a property dispute with Siraj Ibn Wahhaj and his co-conspirators. According to the search warrant, Lucas “Luqman” Morton had purchased land nearby but accidentally built the compound on the Badgers’ land. The Badgers were trying to negotiate a land deal to settle the issue.

The Badgers gave permission to the FBI to search the compound, as it was on their own private property.

How the FBI Dropped the Ball

By early May, the FBI had strong evidence the fugitive believed to have the missing boy in custody was at the New Mexico compound. The legal owners of at least part of the land that the property was on had given permission for a search, making a “probable cause” standard for a search warrant unnecessary.

The FBI also knew this compound was inhabited by Islamist extremists and they were probably acquiring weapons. Our sources say there are indications they engaged in identity fraud and, most likely, other forms of fraud.

The FBI did not act decisively, even as the compound prepared for war and the children were in peril, especially the missing boy who was almost certainly there and whom the FBI knew was in desperate need of medication.

Yet instead of searching the property themselves, what did the FBI do?

They asked the neighbor, Jason Badger, to wear a hidden camera and risk his life by approaching an armed, Islamic extremist compound.

The FBI placed the compound under surveillance for at least two months before the raid, hoping to get a positive identification of the boy’s presence there—even though the extremists at the compound knew identification had to be prevented and had taken visible measures to make sure it didn’t happen.

The Badgers didn’t like the idea of having Islamist extremist neighbors who illegally squatted on their property. They filed a petition to have them evicted.

Their request for eviction—a very brazen move on the part of the Badgers—was rejected by a judge in June.

During an August 7 news conference, a reporter asked why that wasn’t enough for the authorities to go in. The police spokesperson said it was a civil matter and not grounds for a search warrant. The extremists and starving children got to stay.

The trigger for the raid was when the New Mexico police were provided a message by the authorities in Georgia.

A message had come out of the compound. It said the children were starving and they needed food and water.

The New Mexico authorities decided to go in on their own search warrant.

The Raid

The bravery shown by the New Mexico police — who were moved to save the children – can only be imaged.

The compound is on 10 acres of land in the middle of nowhere, making impossible any element of surprise. The police involved in the raid knew there was an enormous chance of a deadly shootout which could have incurred multiple casualties on the part of the police officers.

Sources aware of the investigation described the property as essentially a “training camp” with a shooting range. Neighbors had reported hearing gunfire consistently over the months. The camp looked like it was a compilation of trash, but close observation showed that it was not the handiwork of amateurs.

Tires formed a defensive perimeter. A trailer was half-buried and covered in plastic to stop outsiders from seeing what was going on inside. Various measures had been taken to detect “visitors” and impede an expected raid — wood with nails sticking out it and shattered glass were scattered on the property to alert residents of any intruders.

“It had to be a search warrant and a tactical approach to our own security, because we had learned that the inmates were most likely heavily armed and regarded as extremist of the Muslim faith,” an official from the Taos County Sheriff’s Office explained.

The two men, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj and Lucas Morten, initially did not comply with police orders.

Somehow, they were compelled—or forced—to surrender.

Siraj Ibn Wahhaj had a loaded firearm on him when he was “taken down.”

Between the two of them, they had an AR-15 rifle, four loaded pistols and five loaded 30-round magazines, at the very least. They were obviously preparing to violently resist.

Footage of a walk through the compound shows the Islamist extremists were gearing up for a protracted battle.

Authorities found a 150-foot tunnel with cutouts where sleeping bags were stored so they could hide underground. There was a ladder and a hidden exit outside of Morton’s property for escape.

All told, it was a miracle that a Waco-like shootout did not commence during the raid which occurred on Friday, August 3, 2018.

In sum, five people were arrested and 11 children were rescued. Their condition was likened to that of refugees from a Third World country. Their ribs could be seen because they hadn’t eaten. The police gave them whatever water and snacks they had on them at the time.

The children reportedly appeared “brainwashed” and in great fear.

One boy remained still missing. On Monday, during a follow-up search, a corpse, likely that of the boy, was found.

Shocking Discovery of the Neighbors Post-Raid

The New Mexico police said they searched the compound as best they could with their limited resources.

On Sunday, about two days after the raid on Friday, the Badgers went into the compound to look around. They were shocked by what they found left behind.

The police had failed to seize guns, video cameras, a laptop computer and a tactical vest.

These are key items for prosecution and intelligence; ones that an unidentified co-conspirator would love to have retrieved after the ending of a search. Yet, they were left behind.

Conclusion

While the ultimate responsibility for the death and any injuries lies with the adults responsible, with a look at the information that is currently being reported, it is hard not to wonder what the FBI was waiting for.

We do not know when the boy died, assuming the body that was found was his. Yet, whether quicker, more decisive action could have saved his life is a question that must be answered.

And if the FBI felt it couldn’t act in this situation, then what other dangerous situations with even less evidence aren’t being handled decisively?

What would have stopped the compound leaders from carrying out an attack, abusing the children even more seriously, or deciding to end their lives in a manner reminiscent of Jim Jones or the Branch Davidians at Waco?

If the FBI’s standard for action requires evidence and danger even greater than what was known about the New Mexico compound, then its standard must change.

**

Clarion’s Shillman Fellow and Clarion Intelligence Network Director Ryan Mauro explains how we worked hand in hand with authorities investigating a New Mexico Islamist compound.

Reports suggest children kept in the compound were being trained to stage school shootings.

Here’s more from Ryan:

***

Also see:

Exclusive: FBI Confirms Jihadi Training Camps in America

This knife was one of the many weapons found in the Fuqra compound in Colorado (Photo: video screenshot)

Clarion Project, by Ryan Mauro, Jan. 31, 2018:

Newly-released FBI documents obtained by Clarion Project confirm Clarion’s reports that Jamaat ul-Fuqra is training members in isolated communes across America and Canada.

The group’s “Islamberg” headquarters in upstate New York is its most well-known “Islamic village.”

Fuqra, which now goes by the name of the Muslims of the Americas (MOA) among other titles, is a cultish Islamist group with a history of crime and terrorism. The group is led by Sheikh Mubarak Ali Gilani in Pakistan.

Gilani’s name appeared in headlines in 2002 when Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl was abducted and beheaded on his way to interview Gilani, though the radical cleric was never accused of an involvement in those crimes.

The first FBI document is dated November 27, 2009 and labels the Muslims of the Americas, Inc. as “armed and dangerous.” It begins by summarizing the group’s consistent history of extremism, terrorism and crime:

“Jamaat ul-Fuqra, aka Muslims of the Americas (MOA), have a history of violence and/or violent acts. Use extreme caution when dealing with confirmed members or individuals who are believed to be associated with this group”

The report says that Sheikh Gilani is “thought to be supportive of al-Qaeda,” perhaps referring to the group’s links to al-Qaeda affiliates like Hizbul Mujahideen, to which Fuqra has a history of ties and publicly supports even today.

FBI documents from 2003 that Clarion released in December 2016 mentioned Fuqra’s links to al-Qaeda in Pakistan and use of fronts like security companies in America.

Another newly-released document from December 2010 explicitly refers to “the Muslims of the Americas [aka Fuqra] terrorist organization” and states:

“The MOA [Fuqra] is composed primarily of black American Muslim converts, many who converted to Islam while in prison. Many MOA members reside in rural communities (jamaats) to live and worship free from non-Muslim influence.

The MOA jamaats are located on land that has been privately owned or rented by members. Each jamaat usually has numerous trailers where members reside, a mosque, and a guard post, some with armed guards, at the entrance to the properties. These communities, similar to commune type facilities, have women and children residing in them with the children being homeschooled.

Organized training is also conducted to include weapons training, tactics, hand-to-hand combat, rappelling, and live-fire exercises.”

We have posted these declassified reports  on FuqraFiles.com, Clarion Project’s comprehensive website about the group.

Fuqra has a documented history of conducting basic paramilitary training in America and elsewhere, including more advanced training in Pakistan and Kashmir.

Gilani appeared in a secret video in the early 1990s offering to use Fuqra offices to provide guerilla training to aspiring jihadists. Clarion Project also released a video from 2001-2002 showing women in military attire getting training at Islamberg.

One of Fuqra’s terrorist-training camps, a 101-acre tract of land in Colorado, was raided in 1992. It was subsequently abandoned by the group, as reported in this recent KRDO news report with Heather Skold. You can see pictures from the investigation into the Colorado Fuqra camp on the Fuqra Fileswebsite.

Fuqra fugitives from the training camp were even the subject of an episode of America’s Most Wanted in 1994.

Although these FBI documents from 2009-2011 state that Fuqra has about a dozen “jamaats” in America, the group itself claims to have 22 “Islamic villages” in America alone. The locations for these “Islamic villages” are identified as “Islamberg” in New York, as well as other villages in VirginiaSouth CarolinaGeorgiaTennesseeTexasMichiganCanada and Trinidad and Tobago.

The group also has operations in Pakistan, Kashmir, Canada, Trinidad, Venezuela and elsewhere (Fuqra has a history of being secretive and deceptive about its locations).

FBI reports from a 2003-2007 investigation in Texas warned, “The MOA [Fuqra] is now an autonomous organization which possesses an infrastructure capable of planning and mounting terrorist campaigns overseas and within the U.S.”

That infrastructure can legally operate because Fuqra is not designated as a Foreign Terrorist Organization by the State Department. The Treasury Department has not sanctioned the group’s overseas leaders and entities, either.

Over a dozen North American Muslim groups have joined Clarion Project in asking the U.S. State Department to look at designating Fuqra as a Foreign Terrorist Organization.

The Justice Department’s Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms recently confirmed to Clarion Project that it still has Fuqra members under investigation. ATF has prosecuted Fuqra members on firearms-related charges, including illegal possession of guns.

Clarion Project also recently reported that Fuqra’s General Counsel, Tahirah Amatul-Wadud, is running for Congress in Massachusetts.

FUQRA FILES: Learn More on Would-Be Jihadists in the US

Clarion Project, by Ryan Mauro December 4, 2016:

National TV reports on Clarion Project’s exposé of 22 Islamist villages around the United States where members are preparing for Jihad.

Clarion Project’s national security analyst, Prof. Ryan Mauro, appears on FOX Business Network’s “Varney & Co.” to discuss his report with Martin Mawyer of Christian Action Network about a terror-linked Islamist group in America preparing for jihad in anticipation of being targeted by the Trump Administration. A new website has been created called “The Fuqra Files” to serve as an authoritative database on Jamaat ul-Fuqra/Muslims of America.

Also see:

Ryan Mauro and Michael Cutler vs. CAIR on Newsmax TV: Terror Camps in USA

Sheikh Mubarak Ali Gilani, the radical head of Jamaat ul-Fuqra, a terrorist organization fronted in the U.S. by Muslims of the Americas.

Sheikh Mubarak Ali Gilani, the radical head of Jamaat ul-Fuqra, a terrorist organization fronted in the U.S. by Muslims of the Americas.


Published on Feb 26, 2016 by Ryan Mauro

Clarion Project’s national security analyst, Professor Ryan Mauro, appears on “DML Unfiltered” on Newsmax TV with  representative Wilfredo Ruiz and former INS Special Agent Michael Cutler.

***

Also see: